Memoir of the Life of Richard H. Lee, and His Correspondence with the Most Distinguished Men in America and Europe, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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1825
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Page 278 - And that this assemblage of horrors might want no fact of distinguished die, he is now exciting those very people to rise in arms among us. and to purchase that liberty of which he has deprived them, by murdering the people on whom he also obtruded them : thus paying off' former crimes committed against the LIBERTIES of one people with crimes which he urges them to commit against the LIVES of another...
Page 149 - But, from the necessity of the case, and a regard to the mutual interest of both countries, we cheerfully consent to the operation of such acts of the British parliament, as are bona fide, restrained to the regulation of our external commerce, for the purpose of securing the commercial advantages of the whole empire to the mother country, and the commercial benefits of its respective members ; excluding every idea of taxation internal or external, for raising a revenue on the subjects in America,...
Page 277 - ... for depriving us, in many cases, of the benefits of trial by jury; for transporting us beyond seas, to be tried for pretended offences; for abolishing the free system of English laws in a neighbouring province, establishing therein an arbitrary government, and enlarging its boundaries, so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument, for introducing the same absolute rule into these colonies...
Page 118 - When your lordships look at the papers transmitted us from America, when you consider their decency, firmness, and wisdom, you cannot but respect their cause, and wish to make it your own. For myself, I must declare and avow, that in all my reading and observation...
Page 279 - ... strength of Great Britain: that in constituting indeed our several forms of government, we had adopted one common king, thereby laying a foundation for perpetual league and amity with them : but that submission to their parliament was no part of our constitution, nor ever in idea, if history may be credited...
Page 174 - DO, in the name and by the authority of the good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these united colonies, are, and of right ought to be, free and independent states ; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connexion between them and the state of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved...
Page 278 - He is at this time transporting large armies of foreign mercenaries, to complete the works of death, desolation, and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of cruelty and perfidy,* unworthy the head of a civilized nation.
Page 249 - Author for the advancement and dignity of the world, though divided by distant ages, and by clashing opinions, yet joining as it were in one sublime chorus to celebrate the truths of Christianity, and laying upon its holy altars the never-fading offerings of their immortal wisdom. Against all this concurring testimony, we find suddenly, from the author of this book, that the Bible teaches nothing but " LIES, OBSCENITY, CRUELTY, and INJUSTICE.
Page 277 - He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative Powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.
Page 279 - We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here, no one of which could warrant so strange a pretension; that these were effected at the expense of our own blood and treasure, unassisted by the wealth or the strength of Great Britain; that in constituting indeed our several forms of government, we had adopted one common king, thereby laying a foundation for perpetual league and amity with them; but that submission to their parliament was no part of our Constitution...

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