Defending Democracy: Reactions to Extremism in Interwar Europe

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JHU Press, Feb 9, 2005 - History - 335 pages
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How does a democracy deal with threats to its stability and continued existence when those threats come from political parties that play the democratic game? In Defending Democracy, political scientist Giovanni Capoccia studies key European nations between World Wars I and II which survived such democratic crises.

A comprehensive and thoughtful historical analysis of the democracies of interwar Europe, Defending Democracy provides a unique perspective on the many lessons to be learned from their successes and failures. With this exclusively empirical investigative approach, Capoccia develops a methodology for analyzing contemporary democracies—such as Algeria, Turkey, Israel, and others—where similar political conditions are present. Given the rise of terrorism and the persistence of extremism in both established and new democracies today, continued research and dialogue on the defense of democracy are necessary for its preservation.

  

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Contents

Democratic Stability and Democratic Crisis
3
Antisystem Parties
27
Strategies against Extremism
47
Czechoslovakia
71
Belgium
108
Finland
138
Actors and Strategies in Comparative
179
Conclusion
221
Party Names and Translations
247
Antiextremist Legislation in Czechoslovakia
256
Notes
265
Bibliography
299
Index
325
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About the author (2005)

Giovanni Capoccia is a professor of comparative politics at the University of Oxford.

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