Englishmen Transplanted: The English Colonization of Barbados, 1627-1660

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Oxford University Press, 2003 - History - 217 pages
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Larry Gragg challenges the prevailing view of the seventeenth-century English planters of Barbados as architects of a social disaster. Most historians have described them as profligate and immoral, as grasping capitalists who exploited their servants and slaves in a quest for quick riches in the cultivation of sugar. Yet, they were more than rapacious entrepreneurs. Like English emigrants to other regions in the empire, sugar planters transplanted many familiar governmental and legal institutions, eagerly started families, abided traditional views about the social order, and resisted compromises in their diet, apparel, and housing, despite their tropical setting. Seldom becoming absentee planters, these Englishmen developed an extraordinary attraction to Barbados, where they saw themselves, as one group of planters explained in a petition, as 'being Englishmen transplanted'.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
First Impressions
13
Establishing a Colony 16251660
29
Transplanting Institutions
58
Making Money in the English Atlantic Economy
88
Finding Workers
113
Seeking Opportunity and Financing the Sugar Revolution
132
Creating an Orderly Society
152
Afterword Lasting Impressions
182
Bibliography
193
Index
213
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Larry Gragg is a Professor of History, University of Missouri-Rolla.

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