Parochial and Plain Sermons (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Ignatius Press, 1997 - Religion - 1763 pages
1 Review
All eight volumes of Newman's sermons are brought together in this one beautifully printed and bound volume. Newman's sermons are as powerful, fresh and challenging today as when he first gave them. The topics he covers are ones central to Christianity and salvation. Newman once again demonstrates his tremendous understanding of human psychology and the temptations and trials that we encounter as Christians in the world. 191 sermons in total. A magnificent work of timeless inspiration and illumination for every generation of Christian readers.
  

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Review: Parochial and Plain Sermons [Complete]

User Review  - James Paternoster - Goodreads

Just beginning this, alternating with sermons from Augustine of Hippo, for weekly meditation. Read full review

Review: Parochial and Plain Sermons [Complete]

User Review  - ♥ Ibrahim ♥ - Goodreads

You can download it and read it freely from here: http://books.google.com/books?id=AcIP... Read full review

Contents

IV
5
V
14
VI
22
VII
31
VIII
41
IX
50
X
57
XI
66
CIII
877
CIV
886
CV
895
CVI
904
CVII
914
CVIII
922
CIX
930
CX
938

XII
76
XIII
83
XIV
92
XV
100
XVI
108
XVII
123
XVIII
131
XIX
139
XX
147
XXI
157
XXII
165
XXIII
174
XXIV
181
XXV
189
XXVI
198
XXVII
208
XXVIII
215
XXIX
225
XXX
229
XXXI
236
XXXII
244
XXXIII
253
XXXIV
259
XXXV
265
XXXVI
270
XXXVII
277
XXXVIII
287
XXXIX
295
XL
302
XLI
308
XLII
316
XLIII
324
XLIV
331
XLV
338
XLVI
343
XLVII
358
XLVIII
365
XLIX
375
L
382
LI
389
LII
401
LIII
412
LIV
418
LV
431
LVI
439
LVII
445
LVIII
455
LIX
461
LX
468
LXI
477
LXII
483
LXIII
487
LXIV
496
LXV
504
LXVI
513
LXVII
523
LXVIII
534
LXIX
542
LXX
549
LXXI
556
LXXII
565
LXXIII
572
LXXIV
583
LXXV
594
LXXVI
604
LXXVII
614
LXXVIII
623
LXXIX
633
LXXX
644
LXXXI
655
LXXXII
665
LXXXIII
674
LXXXIV
685
LXXXV
696
LXXXVI
705
LXXXVII
715
LXXXVIII
729
LXXXIX
733
XC
744
XCI
756
XCII
766
XCIII
775
XCIV
784
XCV
793
XCVI
807
XCVII
817
XCVIII
828
XCIX
839
C
850
CI
860
CII
869
CXI
947
CXII
959
CXIII
967
CXIV
977
CXV
988
CXVI
996
CXVII
1005
CXVIII
1014
CXIX
1022
CXX
1033
CXXI
1041
CXXII
1050
CXXIII
1063
CXXIV
1072
CXXV
1083
CXXVI
1092
CXXVII
1100
CXXVIII
1110
CXXIX
1120
CXXX
1130
CXXXI
1139
CXXXII
1149
CXXXIII
1157
CXXXIV
1166
CXXXV
1175
CXXXVI
1185
CXXXVII
1187
CXXXVIII
1196
CXXXIX
1203
CXL
1211
CXLI
1220
CXLII
1230
CXLIII
1239
CXLIV
1246
CXLV
1253
CXLVI
1262
CXLVII
1272
CXLVIII
1282
CXLIX
1295
CL
1305
CLI
1316
CLII
1324
CLIII
1332
CLIV
1345
CLV
1354
CLVI
1361
CLVII
1370
CLVIII
1381
CLIX
1390
CLX
1400
CLXI
1412
CLXII
1419
CLXIII
1421
CLXIV
1428
CLXV
1436
CLXVI
1444
CLXVII
1454
CLXVIII
1463
CLXIX
1470
CLXX
1479
CLXXI
1488
CLXXII
1496
CLXXIII
1503
CLXXIV
1511
CLXXV
1522
CLXXVI
1529
CLXXVII
1536
CLXXVIII
1543
CLXXIX
1550
CLXXX
1558
CLXXXI
1567
CLXXXII
1569
CLXXXIII
1578
CLXXXIV
1595
CLXXXV
1603
CLXXXVI
1611
CLXXXVII
1619
CLXXXVIII
1630
CLXXXIX
1638
CXC
1648
CXCI
1656
CXCII
1666
CXCIII
1673
CXCIV
1682
CXCV
1691
CXCVI
1699
CXCVII
1707
CXCVIII
1714
CXCIX
1723
CC
1747
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Popular passages

Page 33 - The Lord that delivered me out of the paw of the lion, and out of the paw of the bear, he will deliver me out of the hand of this Philistine.
Page 119 - Two things have I required of thee ; deny me them not before I die: Remove far from me vanity and lies: give me neither poverty nor riches ; feed me with food convenient for me: lest I be full, and deny thee, and say, Who is the Lord? or lest I be poor, and steal, and take the name of my God in vain.

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About the author (1997)

John Henry Newman, 1801 - 1890 English clergyman John Henry Newman was born on February 21, 1801. He was educated at Trinity College, University of Oxford. He was the leader of the Oxford movement and cardinal after his conversion to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1822, he received an Oriel College fellowship, which was then the highest distinction of Oxford scholarship, and was appointed a tutor at Oriel. Two years later, he became vicar of St. Mary's, the Anglican church of the University of Oxford, and exerted influence on the religious thought through his sermons. When Newman resigned his tutorship in 1832, he made a tour of the Mediterranean region and wrote the hymn "Lead Kindly Light." He was also one of the chief contributors to "Tracts for the Times" (1833-1841), writing 29 papers including "Tract 90", which terminated the series. The final tract was met with opposition because of its claim that the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England are aimed primarily at the abuses of Roman Catholicism. Newman retired from Oxford in 1842 to the village of Littlemore. He spent three years in seclusion and resigned his post as vicar of St. Mary's on October 9, 1845. During this time, he wrote a retraction of his criticisms of the Roman Catholic Church and after writing his "Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine," he became a Roman Catholic. The following year, he went to Rome and was ordained a priest and entered the Congregation of the Oratory. The remainder of Newman's life was spent in the house of the Oratory that he established near Birmingham. He also served as rector of a Roman Catholic university that the bishops of Ireland were trying to establish in Dublin from 1854-1858. While there, he delivered a series of lectures that were later published as "The Idea of a University Defined" (1873), which says the function of a university is the training of the mind instead of the giving of practical information. In 1864, Newman published "Apologia pro Vita Sua (Apology for His Life)" in response to the charge that Roman Catholicism was indifferent to the truth. It is an account of his spiritual development and regarded as both a religious autobiography and English prose. Newman also wrote "An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent" (1870), and the novels "Loss and Gain" (1848), Callista" (1856) and "The Dream of Gerontius" (1865). Newman was elected an honorary fellow of Trinity College, Oxford, in 1877 and was made cardinal by Pope Leo XIII in 1879. He died on August 11, 1890.

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