Masters in Art: A Series of Illustrated Monographs, Volumes 4-5 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Bates and Guild Company, 1904 - Painting
0 Reviews
Each number is devoted to one artist and includes bibliography of the artist.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Popular passages

Page 204 - ... the coffin-lid, the quietness and gloom of the chamber, the spectacles marking the place where the Bible was last closed, indicating how lonely has been the life, how unwatched the departure, of him who is now laid solitary in his sleep; these are all thoughts — thoughts by which the picture is separated at once from hundreds of equal merit as far as mere painting goes, by which it ranks as a work of the highest art, and stamps its author, not as the neat imitator of the texture of a skin,...
Page 488 - I am now in as good business as the poverty of this place will admit. I make as much money as if I were a Raphael or a Correggio, and three hundred guineas a year, my present income, is equal to nine hundred a year in London.
Page 318 - Art, honour, wisdom, power, affluence, are spared not when death comes. I was called Hubert Van Eyck ; I am now food for worms. Formerly known and highly honoured in painting; this all -was shortly after turned to nothing. It was in the year of the Lord one thousand four hundred and twenty-six, on the eighteenth day of September, that I rendered up my soul to God, in sufferings. Pray God for me, ye who love art, that I may attain to His sight. Flee sin ; turn to the best [objects] : for you must...
Page 488 - ... originals. Were I sure of doing as well in Europe as here, I would not hesitate a moment in my choice; but I might in the experiment waste a thousand pounds and two years of my time, and have to return baffled to America.
Page 374 - The men and the Emperor are in the presence of each other. The soldiers cry to him that they are his, and the impressive Chief, whose Imperial will directs the masses that move around, salutes his devoted army. He and they plainly comprehend each other, and absolute confidence is expressed in every face.
Page 204 - But the close pressure of the dog's breast against the wood, the convulsive clinging of the paws, which has dragged the blanket off the trestle, the total powerlessness of the head laid, close and motionless, upon its folds, the fixed and tearful fall of the eye in its utter hopelessness, the rigidity of repose which marks that there has been no motion nor change in the trance of agony since the last blow was struck on the coffin-lid, the quietness and gloom of the chamber, the spectacles marking...
Page 156 - Lotto was, in fact, the first Italian painter who was sensitive to the varying states of the human soul. He seems always to have been able to define his feelings, emotions, and ideals, instead of being a mere highway for them ; always to recognize at the moment the value of an impression, and to enjoy it to the full before it gave place to another. This makes him preeminently a psychologist, and distinguishes him from such even of his contemporaries as are most like him : from Dürer, who is near...
Page 330 - After this I beheld, and, lo, a great multitude, which no man could number, of all nations, and kindreds, and peoples, and tongues, stood before the throne, and before the Lamb, clothed with white robes, and palms in their hands...
Page 156 - Indeed, to express the master passions of a majority implies a power of impersonal feeling and vision, and implies, too, a certain happy insensibility — the very leaven of genius, perhaps. This insensibility, this impersonal grasp of the world about him, Lotto lacked. A constant wanderer over the face of Italy, he could not shut his eyes to its ruin, nor make a rush for a share in the spoils. The real Renaissance, with all its blithe promise, seemed over and gone. Lotto, like many of his noblest...
Page 204 - ... clear and expressive in the highest degree. But the close pressure of the dog's breast against the wood, the convulsive clinging of the paws, which has dragged the blanket off the trestle, the total powerlessness of the head laid, close and motionless, upon its folds, the fixed and tearful fall of the eye in its utter hopelessness, the rigidity of repose which marks that there has been no motion nor change in the trance of agony since the last blow was struck on the...

Bibliographic information