Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

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Barnes & Noble, 2002 - Common fallacies - 724 pages
16 Reviews
Whenever struck by campaigns, fads, cults and fashions, the reader may take some comfort that Charles Mackay can demonstrate historical parallels for almost every neurosis of our times. The South Sea Bubble, Witch Mania, Alchemy, the Crusades, Fortune-telling, Haunted Houses, and even 'Tulipomania' are only some of the subjects covered in this book, which is given a contemporary perspective through Professor Norman Stone's lively new Introduction.

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Review: Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

User Review  - Ben Sutter - Goodreads

This book is really just a collection of notes and stories with varying levels of substantiation. Like most, I was first drawn this book because of its classic first three chapters on market ... Read full review

Review: Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

User Review  - Al Maki - Goodreads

Today, July 29, 2014, Amazon has a market capitalization of $147,380,000,000 and a price/earnings ratio of 569. That is, people have one hundred forty seven billion dollars invested in Amazon and at ... Read full review

Contents

John Law his birth and youthful careerDuel between Law
1
THE SOUTHSEA BUBBLE
46
Lonrad GesnerTulips brought from Vienna to EnglandRage
89
Copyright

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