Partners in Wonder: Women and the Birth of Science Fiction, 1926-1965

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Lexington Books, 2006 - Literary Criticism - 431 pages
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Partners in Wonder revolutionizes our knowledge of women and early science fiction. Contrary to accepted interpretations, women fans and writers were a welcome and influential part of pulp science fiction from the birth of the genre. Davin finds that at least 203 female authors, under their own female names, published over a thousand stories in science fiction magazines between 1926 and 1965. This work explores the distinctly different form of science fiction that females produced one that was both more utopian and more empathetic than that of their male counterparts. Partners in Wonder presents, for the first time, a complete bibliography of every story published by women writers in science fiction magazines from 1926 to 1965 and brief biographies on 133 of these women writers. It is thus the most comprehensive source of information on early women science fiction writers yet available and of great importance to scholars of women's studies, popular culture, and English literature as well as science fiction."
  

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Contents

The Genesis of the Mythology
29
Present at the Creation
53
Weird Sisters
64
Female Fandom
74
Women Without Names
96
The Usual Suspects
127
Anecdotes and Antidotes
154
Haven in a Heartless World
163
Ecce Femina
245
Alone Against Tomorrow
262
Across the Great Divide
276
A CounterCulture of Tending and Befriending
287
Into Times Abyss
301
The Persistence of Myth
312
Bibliography of Women Science Fiction Writers 19261965
317
The Women That Time Forgot
369

Ebony and Ivory
192
Femalien Empathy
212
Feminist Futures
225
History and Mythistory
239
Some Online Resources
417
Index
419
About the Author
431
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Eric Leif Davin is Lecturer in the Department of History at University of Pittsburgh.

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