Epigram:

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 22, 2010 - History - 180 pages
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This is an introduction to the ancient genre of epigram, short poems literally written or inscribed 'on' an object or figuratively 'on' a topic. The authors set out what epigram means and why it matters, exploring its roots in inscriptions on stone and its literary flourishing in the Hellenistic world after Alexander. They trace its migration from Greece to Rome, where its most famous exponent was Martial, and consider the continuation of Greek epigram under the Roman empire in the so-called 'Second Sophistic'. The final chapter shows how Greek epigram achieved new importance in the nineteenth century as raw material for stories about the classical past.
  

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Contents

The Inscriptional Beginnings of Literary Epigram
22
Epigram in the Hellenistic World
48
Epigram from Greece to Rome
99
Epigram in the Second Sophistic and After
118
Ancient Epigram in Reception
140
Bibliography
163
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About the author (2010)

Gideon Nisbet is Lecturer in Classics, St John's College, Oxford

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