Don't Sleep, There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle

Front Cover
Profile, 2008 - Amazon River Region - 300 pages
19 Reviews
Although Daniel Everett was a missionary, far from converting the Pirahas, they converted him. He shows the slow, meticulous steps by which he gradually mastered their language and his gradual realisation that its unusual nature closely reflected its speakers' startlingly original perceptions of the world. He describes how he began to realise that his discoveries about the Piraha language opened up a new way of understanding how language works in our minds and in our lives, and that this way was utterly at odds with Noam Chomsky's universally accepted linguistic theories. The perils of passionate academic opposition were then swiftly conjoined to those of the Amazon in a debate whose outcome has yet to be won. Adventure, personal enlightenment and the makings of a scientific revolution proceed together in this vivid, funny and moving book.

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Review: Don't Sleep, There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle

User Review  - Marcus - Goodreads

As anyone who has had a conversation with me over the last week can attest to, I think this book, and especially the parts about the culture of the Piraha tribe in the Amazon rainforest is fascinating ... Read full review

Review: Don't Sleep, There are Snakes: Life and Language in the Amazonian Jungle

User Review  - Britt - Goodreads

This book is not terribly well-written. However, the subject matter absolutely fascinating, and the book is completely worth reading solely based on the author's unique experience with the Pirahã. You ... Read full review

About the author (2008)

Daniel Everett was born in California. He lived for many years in the Amazon jungle and conducted research on over a dozen indigenous languages of Brazil. He has published on sound structure, grammar, meaning, culture and language. He has been the subject of endless controversy in academic circles and is currently Professor of Linguistics at Illinois State University.

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