Octagon Magic: The Magic Books #2

Front Cover
Tom Doherty Associates, Apr 1, 2007 - Juvenile Fiction - 192 pages
6 Reviews
The secret of Octagon House

When her grandmother gets sick, eleven-year-old Lorrie Mallard is sent to live with her aunt in the U.S. Things were different back home in Canada, and Lorrie is homesick—especially when boys like Jimmy Purvis and Stan Wormiski tease her. One day, Lorrie finds herself at the door of Octagon House, where she is welcomed by the elderly Miss Ashemeade and her servant, Hallie. Could the kindly Miss Ashemeade truly be a witch, like everyone says? Lorrie doesn’t know, but with the help an old rocking horse and a dollhouse she finds in a mysterious eight-sided room, she begins to unlock the secrets of Octagon House.

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Review: Octagon Magic (The Magic Books #2)

User Review  - Shazza Maddog - Goodreads

My favorite of the 'Magic' series, Octagon Magic explores time travel through the magics of an antique doll house which is based off of the Octagon House. Read full review

Review: Octagon Magic (The Magic Books #2)

User Review  - Lisa the Librarian - Goodreads

I owned this book in junior high. I liked it then and still like it. Well written and intriguing. The story has some suspense, some mystery, some magic and some mystery. Plus a bit of history. It all comes together in this well crafted tale of a lonely girl named Lorrie. Read full review

About the author (2007)

For well over a half century, Andre Norton has been one of the most popular science fiction and fantasy authors in the world. Since her first SF novels were published in the 1940s, her adventure SF has enthralled readers young and old. With series such as Time Traders, Solar Queen, Forerunner, Beast Master, Crosstime, and Janus, as well as many stand-alone novels, her tales of action and adventure throughout the galaxy have drawn countless readers to science fiction. Ms. Norton’s fantasy, including the best-selling Witch World series, her Magic series, and many other novels, has been popular with readers for decades. Lauded as a Grand Master by the Science Fiction Writers of America, she is the recipient of a Life Achievement Award from the World Fantasy Convention.
Ms. Norton has inspired several generations of SF and fantasy writers, especially many talented women writers who have followed in her footsteps.

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