The Applications of Physical Forces (Google eBook)

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Macmillan and Company, 1877 - Physics - 741 pages
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Contents

Mechanism of the regulating pendulum
24
Huygenss cycloidal pendulum
25
Foucaults pendulum experiment
27
The Roman steelyard
29
Weighingmachine or Quintenz balance
30
Peson
31
Robervals balance
32
CHAPTER II
33
Section of a hydraulic pump
34
Desgoffe and Olliviers sterhydraulic press
36
Hydrometer for liquids heavier than water
39
Sykess hydrometer
40
Waterlevels Spiritlevels
41
Spiritlevel
42
Horizontal of a plane obtained with a spiritlevel
43
Principle of fountains and artesian wells
44
A fountain
45
Artesian well at Passy
46
The Pipette The Magic Funnel and Inexhaustible Bottle
47
Pipette
48
The inexhaustible bottle
49
Pumps Atmospheric Pressure employed in the Elevation
50
Suctionpump
51
Doubleaction pump section
52
Common pump with handle and lever
53
Pump with crank and flywheel
54
The new waterwheels and pumps at Marly
55
Plunger pump
56
Stoltzs rotative pump
57
Fireengines
58
Hand fire engine with lever
59
End View of Shand and Masons Equilibrium Fireengine
60
Section of the horizontal steam fireengine showing the arrangement of the forcepumps
62
Pneumatic Machines or Gas or AirPumps i 3
63
Piston of M Deleuils airpump
64
Pneumatic tube of the atmospheric railway of SaintGermain
67
CHAPTER IV
69
Airgun full view and section
70
IIT Deleuils Airpump
71
Hydraulic ram for compressing air Theoretical diagram
72
Compressed Air PostsCompressed Air Railways
77
Measuring Heights by the Barometer
84
Montgollieres or Hotair Balloons and GasBalloonsConstruction
91
Application of Aerostation to Military Purposes to the Study
99
The Harp
107
The SpeakingTrumpet
110
CHAPTER II
119
Bells ami Carillons or Chimes
125
Drums
131
The Violin
138
Bow Instruments of the Violin Family
148
The Piano
161
Instruments with Flute MouthpiecesThe Flageolet Flute
168
Wind Instruments with Bellshaped or Horn Mouthpieces
174
CHAPTER V
181
Organ of Saint Brieuc
187
APPLICATIONS OF THE PHENOMENA AND
201
Goniometers
209
The Siderostat
216
CHAPTER III
233
CHAPTER IV
249
The Great Crgan Primrose Hill London 13
265
The New Telescope of the Paris Observatory
271
75
275
A Fireplace in the Middle Aoks
339
Ventilating Fireplaces
343
Heating by Hot Air
349
CHAPTER III
357
Various Domestic Applications of Heat
363
Compensated Pendulums
369
Distillation
376
Artificial Manufacture of Ice
383
CHAPTER V
389
The Boiler or Steam Generator
396
Safety Appliances
402
THE STEAMENGINE THE DRIVING MACHINERY PAOE I The Cylinder
411
Distribution of the Steam
413
Expansion of the Steam 413
416
The Transmitting Machinery
420
Regulators 422
422
CHAPTER VII
425
Steamengines with Direct Motion
427
Rotatory Steamengines
431
The Power of Steamengines
433
Historical Sketch of the Steamengine
438
Original Model of Newccmens Engine
441
Watt and the Steamengine
443
CHAPTER VIII
445
Paddle Steamers
448
Screw Steamers
450
Marine Boilers and Engines
454
CHAPTER IX
461
Pcffino Billy
463
The Modem Locomotive
466
The Principal Types of Locomotives
470
CompressedAir Locomotives
473
Steam Carriages or RoadLocomotives
477
Portable Engines
484
Various Applications of Steam
487
Steam Applied to Printing
495
Statistics of Steamengines 408
498
Explosion of Steamboilers
500
Combined Engines
503
Gasengines
509
Otto and Lasgens Gasengine
513
CHAPTER I
519
Dip Circles Terrestrial Magnetism
527
Description and Arrangement of Lightningconductors
536
CHAPTER III
543
Dial Telegraphs
559
Dial Telegraphs continued
567
Wheatstones MagnetoAlphabetical Telegraph
573
Writing Telegraphs The Morse and MorseDigney Telegraph
575
Printing TelegraphsHughess System
583
Wheatstones Automatic HighSpeed Printing Telegraph
591
Autographic TelegraphsCasellis and Meyers System
597
CHAPTER V
607
Air Lines Subterranean Lines 507
620
The Lightning Conductors
627
ELECTRIC HOROLOGY
633
Electric Clocks properly so called 039
639
Electric Time Signals
645
CHAPTER VII
651
HI Various Applications of Electromotors
657
View of the Electric Room at the New Opera House in Paris
683
The Electric Light during the Siege of Paris
689
The Siemens Light Arranged for Travelling
691

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Page 381 - Shallow pits are dug, which are partially filled with straw, and on the straw flat pans containing water are exposed to the clear firmament. The water is a powerful radiant, and sends off its heat copiously into space. The heat thus lost cannot be supplied from the earth — this source being cut off by the non-conducting straw. Before sunrise a cake of ice is formed in each vessel.
Page 660 - Siemens' armature. When the machine was in full action it melted a rod of iron 15 inches in length and a quarter of an inch in diameter, and gave the most brilliant illuminating effects when the discharge took place between carbon points. As nearly as could be estimated, the mechanical force absorbed in producing these results was from eight to ten-horse power. Wilde's machines have been successfully employed by Messrs. Elkington for the precipitation of copper and other metals, and he has lately...
Page 540 - ... sufficient protection for an ordinary building against any thunder-storm in this climate. The copper wire may be built into the wall to prevent theft, but it should be connected to any outside metal, such as lead or zinc on the roof, and to metal rain-water pipes. In the case of a powder-mill, it might be advisable to make the network closer by carrying one or two additional wires over the roof and down the walls to the wire at the foundation. If there are water- or gas-pipes which enter the...
Page 663 - В the helices, or bobbins, are seen both in section and detached ; and at RR the form is shown of one of the insulated copper conductors, to which the contiguous ends of the wires of the helices are attached, and from which the current is drawn off by means of rubbers or brushes formed of flexible bundles of copper wire. These brushes are so applied at the neutral positions of the ring that they begin to touch one of the conductors R, before they have left the preceding one. In this way no actual...
Page xxxvi - Ib. raised to a height of one foot in one minute of time. The force competent to produce a velocity of one metre in one second, in a mass of one gramme, is sometimes adopted as a unit of force. Unit of Heat.
Page xxxv - ... grains. The French measures of weight are derived at once from the measures of capacity, by taking the weight of cubic millimetres, centimetres, decimetres, or metres of water at its maximum density, that is at 4° C. or 39° Fah.
Page 540 - ... no such metallic connections with distant points, it is not necessary to take any pains to facilitate the escape of the electricity into the earth. Still less is it advisable to erect a tall conductor with a sharp point in order to relieve the thunder-clouds of their charge.
Page 742 - LESSONS IN ELEMENTARY CHEMISTRY, INORGANIC AND ORGANIC. By HENRY E. ROSCOE, FRS, Professor of Chemistry in Owens College, Manchester. With numerous Illustrations and Chromo-Litho. of the Solar Spectrum, and of the Alkalies and Alkaline Earths, New Edition.
Page 742 - Schorlemmer.— A MANUAL OF THE CHEMISTRY OF THE CARBON COMPOUNDS, OR ORGANIC CHEMISTRY.
Page xxxiii - Treasury, a new standard yard, bearing the proportion to a pendulum, vibrating seconds of mean time, in the latitude of London, in a vacuum, and at the level of the sea, as 36 inches to 39

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