The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq: In Nine Volumes Complete, with His Last Corrections, Additions, and Improvements, as They Were Delivered to the Editor a Little Before His Death, Together with the Commentary and Notes of Mr. Warburton, Volume 8 (Google eBook)

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A. Millar, J. and R. Tonson, C. Bathurst, R. Baldwin, W. Johnston, J. Richardson, B. Law, S. Crowder, T. Longman, T. Field, and T. Caslon, 1760 - English poetry
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Page 12 - Jan. 21, 1715-16. I KNOW of nothing that will be so interesting to you at present, as some circumstances of the last act of that eminent comic poet, and our friend, Wycherley. He had often told me, as I doubt not he did all his acquaintance, that he would marry as soon as his life was despaired of : Accordingly a few days before his death he underwent the ceremony ; and joined together those two sacraments which, wise men say, should be the last we receive...
Page 37 - ... radiations; and when you have a mind to light it up, it affords you a very different scene. It is finished with...
Page 148 - DEAR MR. GAY, Welcome to your native soil, welcome to your friends, thrice welcome to me, whether returned in glory, blest with court interest, the love and familiarity of the great, and filled with agreeable hopes ; or melancholy with dejection, contemplative of the changes of fortune, and doubtful for the future. Whether returned a triumphant Whig or a...
Page 121 - I desire you to make) you think as I do, that it is written in the very spirit of the ancients, it deserves your care, and is capable of being improved, with little trouble, into a perfect model and standard of tragic poetry...
Page 12 - I saw our friend twice after this was done, less peevish in his sickness than he used to be in his health; neither much afraid of dying, nor (which in him had been more likely) much ashamed of marrying.
Page 13 - My dear, it is only this, that you will never marry an old man again.
Page 103 - Spencer ; and I will take care to make good in every respect what I said to him when living ; particularly as to the triplet he wrote for his own epitaph ; which, while we were in good terms, I promised him should never appear on his tomb while I was dean of Westminster.
Page 107 - Tickell chose to inscribe his verses, should be dead also before they were published. Had I been in the editor's place I should have been a little apprehensive for myself, under a thought that every one who had any hand in that work was to die before the publication of it.
Page 131 - ... utterly forgetful of that world from which we are gone, and ripening for that to which we are to go. If you retain any memory of the past...
Page 150 - Parnell and I have been inseparable ever since you went. We are now at the Bath, where (if you are not, as I heartily hope, better engaged) your coming would be the greatest pleasure to us in the world. Talk not of expenses: Homer shall support his children. I beg a line from you, directed to the Post-house in Bath. Poor Parnell is in an ill state of health.

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