Poems of the English race (Google eBook)

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1921 - Poetry - 410 pages
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Contents

the Court of Faery Michael Drayton
12
The Rape of the Lock Alexander Pope
17
The Painter who Pleased Nobody John Gay
29
Boadicea William Cowper
30
Tam OShanter Robert Burns
31
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner Samuel Taylor Coleridge
33
Simon Lee William Wordsworth
41
Bishop Hatto Robert Southey
42
Lucy Gray William Wordsworth
43
Lochinvar Walter Scott
51
The Battle of the Baltic Thomas Campbell
52
The Destruction of Sennacherib Lord Byron
53
Christabel Samuel Taylor Coleridge
57
The Burial of Sir John Moore Charles Wolfe
60
La Belle Dame sans Merci John Keats
61
The Eve of St Agnes John Keats
62
The Red Fisherman Winthrop Mackworth Praed
67
The Belle of the BallRoom Winthrop Mackworth Praed
70
Bonny Dundee Walter Scott
72
The Silent Tower of Bottreau Robert Stephen Hawker
73
The Lady of Shalott Alfred Tennyson
74
The Last Buccaneer Thomas Babtngton Macaulay
76
The Skeleton in Armor Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
78
Horatius Thomas Babington Macaulay
80
My Last Duchess Robert Browning
86
The Shepherd of King Admetus James Russell Lowell
87
Abou Ben Adhem Leigh Hunt
89
Rime of the Duchess May Elizabeth Barrett Browning
90
How They Brought the Good News Robert Browning
96
The Boy and the Angel Robert Browning
97
Incident of the French Camp Robert Browning
98
The Raven Edgar Allan Poe
100
Iphigeneia and Agamemnon Walter Savage Landor
103
Sir Humphrey Gilbert Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
104
Sohrab and Ruttum Matthew Arnold
106
The Charge of the Light Brigade Alfred Tennyson
119
Instans Tyrannus Robert Browning
120
Ballad of Sir John Franklin George Henry Boker
121
Skipper Iresons Ride John Greenleaf Whittier
123
King Solomon Owen Meredith Lord Lytton
124
King Robert of Sicily Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
125
The Courtin James Russell Lowell
128
The Lady of the Land William Morris
130
Gareth and Lynette Alfred Tennyson
137
Lancelot and Elaine Alfred Tennyson
160
The Passing of Arthur Alfred Tennyson
181
Hervi Riel Robert Browning
189
The Revenge Alfred Tennyson
191
A Ballad of the French Fleet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
193
Pheidippides Robert Browning
194
The Charge of the Heavy Brigade Alfred Tennyson
196
The White Ship Dante Gabrtel Rossetti
197
The Ballad of Judas I sea riot Robert Buchanan
201
The Slaying of Urgan Algernon Charles Swinburne
204
Opportunity Edward Rowland Sill
205
The High Tide at Gettysburg Will Henry Thompson
206
A Ballad of East and West Rudyard Kipling
207
The Ballad of Moll Magee William Butler Yeats
209
Elfin Skates Eugene LeeHamilton
210
The Last Chantey Rudyard Kipling
211
Craven Henry Newbolt
212
Gillespie Henry Newbolt
213
Forty Singing Seamen Alfred Noyes
214
The Listeners Walter de la Mare
215
The Dauber Rounds Cape Horn John Masefield
216
The Star Sara Teasdale
218
The Finding of Jamie John G Neihardt
219
PART TWO LYRICAL AND REFLECTIVE POEMS
225
92 When in disgrace with Fortune and mens eyes 93 When to the sessions of sweet silent thought 94 That time of year thou mayst in me behold Sir P...
227
William Shakespeare
228
22I 229
229
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
230
io1 Sonnet Since theres no help Michael Drayton
231
The Pulley George Herbert
232
Penseroso John Milton
234
Death John Donne
236
no Song Why so pale and wan? Sir John Suckling
240
Corinnas Going aMaying Robert Hirrick
241
A Thanksgiving to God for his House Robert Herrick
242
A Christmas Carol Robert Herrick
243
Song The glories of our blood James Shirley
244
Alexanders Feast John Dryden
245
The Spacious Firmament on High Joseph Addison
247
Ode written in 1746 William Collins
248
Elegy written in a Country Churchyard Thomas Gray
249
The Deserted Village Oliver Goldsmith
251
The Jackdaw William Cowper
258
To a Mouse Robert Burns
259
Scots wha Hae Robert Burns
260
Lines Written in Early Spring William Wordsworth
261
Highland Mary Robert Burns
262
She Dwelt among the Untrodden Ways William Wordsworth
263
Wandered Lonely as a Cloud William Wordsworth
264
To a SkyLark William Wordsworth
265
William Wordsworth
268
15a Written in London September 1802 169
269
She Walks in Beauty Lord Byron
270
On First Looking into Chapmans Homer John Keats
271
To a Skylark Percy Bysshe Shelley
280
A Dirge Percy Bysshe Shelley
281
A Forest Hymn William Cullen Bryant
282
A Health Edward Coate Pinkney
283
173 The Landing of the Pilgrim Fathers Felicia Dorothea Hemans
284
Old Ironsides Oliver Wendell Holmes
285
Concord Hymn Ralph Waldo Emerson
286
The Rhodora Ralph Waldo Emerson
287
Maidenhood Henry Wadsviorth Longfellow
288
Marching Along Robert Browning
289
Locksley Hall Alfred Tennyson
290
Ulysses Alfred Tennyson
295
Sir Galahad Alfred Tennyson
296
The Song of the Shirt Thomas Hood
297
The Cry of the Children Elizabeth Barrett Browning
298
Rondeau Leigh Hunt
300
The Present Crisis James Russell Lowell
301
The Arsenal at Springfield Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
303
The Old Clock on the Stairs Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
304
HomeThoughts from Abroad Robert Browning
305
Shakespeare Matthew Arnold
306
Song Old Adam the carrion crow Thomas Lovell Beddoes
307
The Splendor Falls Alfred Tennyson
308
Ring out wild bells to the wild sky
309
SelfDependence Matthew Arnold
313
Come into the Garden Maud Alfred Tennyson
314
Evelyn Hope Robert Browning
315
The Patriot Robert Browning
316
Up at a VillaDown in the City Robert Browning
317
Love Among the Ruins Robert Browning
318
America Sydney Dobell
319
There was a Child Went Forth Walt Whitman
320
The Grass Walt Whitman
321
My Lost Youth Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
322
Robert of Lincoln William Cullen Bryant
323
The Barefoot Boy John Greenleaf Whittier
324
A Farewell Charles Kingsley
325
The Living Temple Oliver Wendell Holmes
326
Drifting Thomas Buchanan Read
327
Our Country Julia Ward Howe
328
Dirge for a Soldier George Henry Boker
329
Young and Old Charles Kingsley
330
Boston Hymn Ralph Waldo Emerson
331
Rabbi Ben Ezra Robert Browning
332
Prospice Robert Browning
335
Ode Recited at the Harvard Commem oration James Russell Lowell
336
A Match Algernon Charles Swinburne
341
Rugby Chapel Matthew Arnold
342
East London Matthew Arnold
344
Aladdin James Russell Lowell
345
St John Baptist Arthur OShaughnessy
346
My Strawberry Helen Hunt Jackson
347
Songs of Palms Arthur OShaughnessy
348
The Reason Why Frederick LockerLampson
349
To the ManofWar Bird Walt Whitman
350
When I Saw You Last Rose Austin Dob3on
351
Ballade of Dead Cities Edmund Gosse
353
The Marshes of Glynn Sidney Lanier
354
London Snow Robert Bridges
356
A Ballad of Trees and the Master Sidney Lanier
357
The Way to Arcady Henry Cuyler Bunner
358
The Milkmaid Austin Dobson
359
March Algernon Charles Siainburne
360
England Queen of the Waves Algernon Charles Swinburne
361
Epilogue Robert Browning
362
When Burbage Played Austin Dobson
363
The Robin Emily Dickinson
364
Fresh from his Fastnesses William Ernest Henley
366
The Lake Isle of Innisfree William Butler Yeats
367
History William Watson
368
A More Ancient Mariner Bliss Carman
369
The Butterfly John B Tabb
370
The Joy of the Hills Edwin Markham
371
An Anglers Wish Henry van Dyke
372
3I1 Each in his Own Tongue William Herbert Carruth 37a 312 Evensong Robert Louis Stevenson
373
Lad Have You Things to Do? A E Housman
374
America and England George Edward Woodberry
375
Recessional Rudyard Kipling
376
When the Great Gray Ships Come In Guy Wetmore Carryl
377
Two Taverns Edwin Markham
378
The Menagerie William Vaughn Moody
379
Sea Fever John Minefield
381
Kew in LilacTime Alfred Noyes
382
To a Greek Bootblack O W Firkins
383
Saturday Night James Oppenheim
384
The Conquest of the Air Harold T Pulsifer
385
Scum o the Earth Robert Haven Schauffler
386
34a The MerryGoRound Margaret L Woods
387
Jesus the Carpenter Charles M Sheldon
388
The Making of Birds Katharine Tynan
389
The Heritage Abbie Farwell Brown
390
Panama Hymn Wendell Phillips Stafford
391
Invocation Wendell Phillips Stafford
392
Trees Joyce Kilmer 39S 352 The Look Sara Teasdale
393
The Little Boy and the Locomotive Benjamin R C Low
394
Nod Walter de la Mare
395
The Dawn of Peace Alfred Noyes
396
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Page 89 - ABOU BEN ADHEM (may his tribe increase!) Awoke one night from a deep dream of peace, And saw within the moonlight in his room, Making it rich and like a lily in bloom, An angel writing in a book of gold: Exceeding peace had made Ben Adhem bold, And to the presence in the room he said, "What writest thou?" The vision raised its head, And, with a look made of all sweet accord, Answered, "The names of those who love the Lord." "And is mine one?" said Abou. "Nay, not so,
Page 263 - My heart leaps up when I behold A rainbow in the sky: So was it when my life began ; So is it now I am a man ; So be it when I shall grow old, Or let me die! The child is father of the man; And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety.
Page 272 - The hills Rock-ribbed, and ancient as the sun, the vales Stretching in pensive quietness between; The venerable woods rivers that move In majesty, and the complaining brooks That make the meadows green ; and, poured round all, Old ocean's gray and melancholy waste, Are but the solemn decorations all Of the great tomb of man. The golden sun, The planets, all the infinite host of heaven, Are shining on the sad abodes of death, Through the still lapse of ages.
Page 230 - It is not growing like a tree In bulk, doth make Man better be ; Or standing long an oak, three hundred year, To fall a log at last, dry, bald, and sere : A lily of a day Is fairer far in May, Although it fall and die that night It was the plant and flower of Light. In small proportions we just beauties see ; And in short measures life may perfect be.
Page 263 - SHE dwelt among the untrodden ways Beside the springs of Dove, A maid whom there were none to praise And very few to love: A violet by a mossy stone Half hidden from the eye! Fair as a star, when only one Is shining in the sky. She lived unknown, and few could know When Lucy ceased to be; But she is in her grave, and, oh, The difference to me!
Page 236 - YET once more, O ye laurels, and once more, Ye myrtles brown, with ivy never sere, I come to pluck your berries harsh and crude, And with forced fingers rude Shatter your leaves before the mellowing year. Bitter constraint and sad occasion dear Compels me to disturb your season due; For Lycidas is dead, dead ere his prime, Young Lycidas, and hath not left his peer.
Page 295 - In offices of tenderness, and pay Meet adoration to my household gods, When I am gone. He works his work, I mine. There lies the port ; the vessel puffs her sail : There gloom the dark broad seas. My mariners, Souls that have toil'd, and wrought, and thought with me That ever with a frolic welcome took The thunder and the sunshine, and opposed Free hearts, free foreheads you and I are old ; Old age hath yet his...
Page 244 - The glories of our blood and state Are shadows, not substantial things ; There is no armour against fate ; Death lays his icy hand on kings : Sceptre and crown Must tumble down, And in the dust be equal made With the poor crooked scythe and spade. Some men with swords may reap the field, And plant fresh laurels where they kill : But their strong nerves at last must yield ; They tame but one another still : Early or late They stoop to fate, And must give up their murmuring breath When they, pale captives,...
Page 295 - ULYSSES It little profits that an idle king, By this still hearth, among these barren crags, Match'd with an aged wife, I mete and dole Unequal laws unto a savage race, That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me. I cannot rest from travel: I will drink Life to the lees: all times I have enjoy'd Greatly, have suffer'd greatly, both with those That loved me, and alone; on shore, and when Thro...
Page 335 - Fear death? to feel the fog in my throat, The mist in my face, When the snows begin, and the blasts denote I am nearing the place, The power of the night, the press of the storm, The post of the foe; Where he stands, the Arch Fear in a visible form, Yet the strong man must go: For the journey is done and the summit attained, And the barriers fall, Though a battle's to fight ere the guerdon be gained, The reward of it all. I was ever a fighter, so one fight more, The best and the last!

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