Cape Cod and the Old Colony (Google eBook)

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1920 - Cape Cod - 284 pages
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Page 285 - Laser Print natural white, a 60 # book weight acid-free archival paper which meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48-1992 (permanence of paper) Preservation photocopying and binding by Acme Bookbinding Charlestown, Massachusetts CD 1995 The borrower must return this item on or before the last date stamped below.
Page 261 - English, not being oppressed with extremity of heat, nor nipped by biting cold; by which means, blessed be God, we enjoy our health, notwithstanding those difficulties we have undergone, in such a measure as would have been admired if we had lived in England with the like means.
Page 213 - No sea but what is vexed by their fisheries. No climate that is not witness to their toils.
Page 261 - Plantation lieth in the latitude of 42, it must needs be much hotter. 1 confess I cannot give the reason of the contrary ; only experience teacheth us, that if it do exceed England, it is so little as must require better judgments to discern it. And for the winter, I rather think (if there be difference) it is both sharper and longer in New England than...
Page 261 - Then for the temperature of the air, in almost three years' experience, I can scarce distinguish New England from Old England, in respect of heat, and cold, frost, snow, rain, winds, &c.
Page 217 - A description of the eastern coast of the county of Barnstable. from Cape Cod, or Race Point, in latitude 42 5', to Cape Malabar, or the Sandy Point of Chatham, in latitude 41 33', pointing out the spots on which the trustees of the Humane Society have erected huts.
Page 276 - ... mosses on the thin edge of a spring snow-bank, the bubbling spring at the hill-foot near tide water, the fat, crimson roses under his mother's windows, with a clump of Aaron's rod or lilac for background ; the yellow dawn of an October morning across his misty moors, and the fog of the chill pond among the pine trees, and above all the blue sea within its headlands, on which go the whitewinged ships to that great far-off world which the boy had heard of and the grown man knows so well.
Page 218 - Barnstable," printed in 1802, pointing out the spots on which the Trustees of the Humane Society have erected huts called Charity or Humane Houses, "and other places where shipwrecked seamen may look for shelter.
Page 261 - I cannot give the reason of the contrary ; only experience teacheth us, that if it do exceed England, it is so little as must require better judgments to discern it. And for the winter, I rather think (if there be difference) it is both sharper and longer in New England than Old : and yet the want of those comforts in the one which I have enjoyed in the other, may deceive my judgment also. But in my best observation, comparing our...

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