The Journal of the Society of Chemical Industry (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Society of Chemical Industry, 1884 - Chemical industry
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Contents

Rosolic Acid
20
Sand Soap 573
24
balance A Apparatus for Dyeing Bleaching c 170
25
Saccharine Liquors Defecating or Clarifying
28
Naphthol Beta Colours from 567
29
Ward Employment of Sheets pf Gloss in the Leaden
30
Dephosphorising Process Slags Phosphates from 115
32
Lane J and Steuart D V Extraction of Carbolic Acid
34
and Smith Watson Formation of Ammonia
37
Lassaigne Printing with Lend Chromate 254
44
Warder Effect of Temperature on Chemical Action 215
52
Air Action in Bleaching 207
56
DiBtillcrs1 Residues Treatment for Cattle Food 578
58
Weber Analyses of Slags 487
63
354
77
Alcohol Beverages free from 578
80
McArthur Refrigerating Waste Liquors 615
88
Generator lias Analyses of
90
SimonCarves Coke Oven lillus i 507
97
Hiissener A Coke Ovens
101
Jacobscn Hydrocarbons from Camphor 371
107
Discussion on Alizarin in Wool Dyeing 601
108
Earthenware Enamelling 174
109
Alloys Manufacture of 641
110
Simpson J Extraction of Sulphur Compounds from
111
Jameson J Coke Ovens illus 101 131 511
114
Electric White Lead Gardners 318
118
Latzcheiiberger J Estimation of Ammonia in Animal
121
Ost H Pyridine in Commercial Ammonia 318
124
Johnson Discussion on PorterClark Process 54
126
Mericourt Leroy de Tinned Food 191
129
Otto C and Co Coke Oven illus 104 505
133
Action of Isatin on Thiophene 236
137
Kmbossed Designs on Plush etc 106
141
Grimshaw H Discussion on Dyeing and Printing
149
Johnstone E Decomposilion of Ammonia by Heat
157
Laubcnheimcr Reaction of Xylene with Phenanthreno
160
Michael A Action of Aldehydes on Phenols 233
162
Alphanaphtholmethyl Ether Yellow Dye from
165
Michalowski Blasting Powder 646
168
Enamelling Cast Iron
174
Miller W See Doebner and Miller 246 566
176
Shea Butter
182
Nitrates Action on Alkaline Sulphides 138
185
Parchment Paper Manufacture 35
188
Salis E v See Ndlting and Salis 27
190
lAuer Blasting Submerged Rock
192
Pass E de W aterproofing Fabrics 443
193
Laundry Blue 104
221
Mitchell G D H Production of Ammonia
223
Faterno Amylnaphthalene 511
224
Schcurer O Soaps for Coloured Goods 181
231
Phenol Action of Phosphorus Trisulphidc on 162
234
Mitscherlich A Manufacture of Wood Pulp illus 327
236
Schierholz A Enamelling Ceramic Articles 174
243
Pattison Discussion on Algin
247
Moldenhaucr C and Hcinzerling C Purification
249
Raising Beer by Carbonic Acid 528
252
Schmid H Adulteration of Tartar Emetic 329
254
Mbller K See HUssener and Mdller 104
259
Lawcs Gilbert and Warington Nitrogen in Drain Water 183
260
Societe Anonyme Fonderie de Nickel et Mctaux Blancs
261
Phillips H See Holland and Phillips
296
Societe Anon d Mat Coles and d Prod Chim St Denis
319
Phenolphtlnilein as Indicator for Carbon Dioxide 456
323
Phosphates Analysis of 3 19
343
Phosphorites Treatment of Calcareous 323
355
t1eJ Sulphurous Acid Gas Machine
357
Photometry New Phases in illus 277
370
Lechner Coalcutting Machine
371
Pierre Hydrate of Sulphurous Acid 413
373
Cerium Soluble Neutral Salts of
376
Pit Furnaces Manufacture of Glass in 105
377
Societe Anon d Prod Chim de lEst Manufacture
389
Springer O Double Puddling Furnace 174
397
Cherries Development of 181
402
Nageli Action of Yeast
406
Chlorindigo
411
Steffens F W Manuring Rye with Kainite and Bone
417
Lewis G T Treatment of Complex Ores 261
437
Chromium Oxide on Calico 255
457
Liernur Treatment of Sewage 48
459
Clarifier for Cane Juice 645
463
Lamp for Burning Light Petroleums illus 652
476
Valcrolactone in WoodVinegar
478
111
515
302
521
Groger Estimation of Free Fatty Acids
530
291
563
See Couper and Rae 475
572
See Fischer and Reese 263
579
s
589
White Cement 110
610
Sodio Calcic Carbonates
630
Reihlen A Fermentation of Wine Beer etc 189
646

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 116 - THE ART OF SOAP-MAKING. A Practical Handbook of the Manufacture of Hard and Soft Soaps, Toilet Soaps, &c. Including many New Processes, and a Chapter on the Recovery of Glycerine from Waste Leys. By ALEXANDER WATT.
Page 45 - ... material. The interiors of the cells so built up are in communication directly with each other, or with a common channel, for the introduction of the matter operated upon, and as nothing introduced into the cells can find an exit without passing through the cloth, the solid matter fills up their interior, the liquid leaving by the drainage surfaces. The cells of the machine are subjected to pressure, which increases as the operation goes on.
Page 45 - The Society of Chemical Industry," London, by Mr. CC Hutchinson, a member of the firm of SH Johnson & Co. "The filter press consists of a number of narrow cells held in a suitable frame, the interior faces being provided with appropriate drainage surfaces communicating with an outlet, and covered by a filtering medium, generally cloth or paper.
Page 278 - The following considerations will show the reasons for this : When two lights are opposed to each other in a horizontal direction, and a vertical screen is placed between them, it is evident that the rays impinging thereon must do so in accordance with the well-known law of the squares of the distance. If the actual distance of one of the lights from the screen remains constant while travelling through the circumference of a circle whose centre is coincident with the centre of the disc, the number...
Page 281 - But in the case of flat-flame burners, it is necessary that this series should be made in duplicate, one with the flame flat, or at right angles to the bar of the Photometer, and one with the flame placed with its edge to the bar. An extensive series of experiments on this point has...
Page 45 - ... account of the expense they entail both for fuel and labor; (2) the pollution of the neighborhood of the works by offensive odors invariably given off. The removal of the water by evaporation, as will be apparent, is infinitely more complex than the simple evaporation of water in an ordinary boiler, in which, under ordinary circumstances, good fuel will evaporate from 7 to 9 times its own weight of water. So high an evaporative efficiency is impossible with sludge, and it is more than probable...
Page 42 - Where the water is foul [that is, not purified by precipitation] I can speak positively to it, from repeated observation in different places, that the odour, particularly at night, and particularly upon still damp evenings in autumn, is very sickly indeed, and that in all these cases a great deal of disease prevails.
Page 130 - Myriads of minute worms were developed in the animal charcoal, and passed out with the water, when these filters were used for Thames water, and when the charcoal was not renewed at sufficiently short intervals. The property which animal charcoal possesses in a high degree, of favoring the growth of the low forms of organic life, is a serious drawback to its use as a filtering medium for potable waters.
Page 48 - HP actual ) is about 1,000. Thirty tons of wet sludge can be easily pressed into cakes, containing 50 per cent, of moisture, equalling six tons, or one-fifth of the original bulk, consisting of 5 charges from each machine of 12 cwt.
Page 48 - The labor required is about two-thirds of the time of two men. The cost of the operation, determined from actual work extending over two years at Coventry, amounts, with all expenses included, to sixpence per ton of wet sludge, or halfa-crown per ton of pressed cake, and on a larger scale this expense will be somewhat less.

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