Against Common Sense: Teaching and Learning Toward Social Justice

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Psychology Press, 2004 - Education - 121 pages
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Drawing on his own experience teaching diverse grades and subjects, Kevin Kumashiro examines aspects of teaching and learning toward social justice, and suggests concrete implications for K-12 teachers and teacher educators.
  

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Contents

Introduction
xvii
Movements toward AntiOppressive Teacher Education
1
Three Teacher Images in US Teacher Education Programs
5
Teacher as Learned Practitioner
6
Teacher as Researcher
10
Teacher as Professional
13
Preparing Teachers for Crisis A Sample Lesson
17
What It Means to Learn
21
Reading against Racism
64
Lenses of Teachers
67
Examples from Music
69
Christianity Colonialism and a Song from Hawaii
70
Risks and Emotions
75
Examples from Foreign Languages
79
Cultural Context and the Problem of Difference
81
Cultural Norms in Schools
85

Learning through Crisis
27
Preparing Teachers for Uncertainty A Sample Lesson
31
Unintentional Ways of Teaching
32
Teaching with Uncertainty
35
Preparing Teachers for Healing A Conversation with Buddhism
39
Preparing Teachers for Activism A Reflection on Things Queer
43
Preparing AntiOppressive Teachers in Six Disciplines
49
Examples from Social Studies
51
Second World War and Silences in the Curriculum
52
War on Terrorism ans Silences in the Media
54
Why Did We Do This?
59
Examples form English Literature
61
Reading about Racism
62
Examples from the Natural Sciences
87
Gendered Stories
88
Stories about Science
92
Examples from Mathematics
95
RealLife Problems Real Limitations
97
Institutional Demands
101
With Hope
105
Afterword
109
Troubling Knowledge
111
References
116
Index
117
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Kevin K. Kumashiro is the founding director of the Center for Anti-Oppressive Education. He is also the author of Troubling Education (RoutledgeFalmer), winner of the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award, 2003.

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