Bentley's Miscellany, Volume 23 (Google eBook)

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Richard Bentley, 1848
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Page 134 - And in my breast the imperfect joys expire; Yet Morning smiles the busy race to cheer, And new-born pleasure brings to happier men; The fields to all their wonted tribute bear; To warm their little loves the birds complain. I fruitless mourn to him that cannot hear And weep the more because I weep in vain.
Page 152 - A double dungeon wall and wave Have made and like a living grave. Below the surface of the lake The dark vault lies...
Page 133 - Windsor's heights th' expanse below Of grove, of lawn, of mead survey, Whose turf, whose shade, whose flowers among Wanders the hoary Thames along His silver-winding way...
Page 388 - Then leave the poor Plebeian his single tie to life The sweet, sweet love of daughter, of sister, and of wife, The gentle speech, the balm for all that his vexed soul endures, The kiss, in which he half forgets even such a yoke as yours. Still let the maiden's beauty swell the father's breast with pride; Still let the bridegroom's arms infold an unpolluted bride.
Page 134 - The Church-yard abounds with images which find a mirror in every mind, and with sentiments to which every bosom returns an echo.
Page 388 - Heap heavier still the fetters; bar closer still the grate; Patient as sheep we yield us up unto your cruel hate. But, by the Shades beneath us, and by the Gods above, Add not unto your cruel hate your yet more cruel love!
Page 270 - Whose game was empires and whose stakes were thrones ? Whose table, earth whose dice were human bones ? Behold the grand result in yon lone isle, And, as thy nature urges, weep or smile.
Page 527 - Nor were the chiefs Of victory less assured, by long success Elate, and proud of that o'erwhelming strength Which, surely they believed, as it had rolled Thus far...
Page 254 - Hannibal must, in the course of nature, have been dead, and consider how the isolated Phoenician city of Carthage was fitted to receive and to consolidate the civilization of Greece, or by its laws and institutions to bind together barbarians of every race and language into an organized empire, and prepare them for becoming, when that empire was dissolved, the free members of the commonwealth of Christian Europe...
Page 192 - MAN hath a weary pilgrimage As through the world he wends, On every stage from youth to age Still discontent attends ; With heaviness he casts his eye Upon the road before, And still remembers with a sigh The days that are no more.

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