Australia and New Zealand: Economy, Society and Environment

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Arnold, 2000 - Social Science - 391 pages
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This book focuses on the economic and social development of Australia and New Zealand in the twentieth century. It considers how the two countries have developed from their close colonial ties with the UK to a position identified closely with the broad Asia-Pacific region through trade, investment and immigration. It is recent developments that occupy most of its content, but scope is given to the long-term changes that have taken place since initial human occupation, and especially since the first European settlements. Hence, there is a mixture of various systematic aspects of the geography of Australia and New Zealand: economic, social, cultural, political and environmental dimensions all feature in the ensuing analysis.



A wide range of themes and issues are included, with full use of reference to current geographical research on key topics. Good use is made of opportunities to make comparisons and draw contrasts between the two countries. The book is divided into four parts: the environment; historical, cultural and economic development; society; and the economy. It is introductory in the sense that it provides a guide to the main components of the two countries' changing geographies, but without encompassing the depth of specialist studies dealing with just one aspect of geographical change.

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About the author (2000)

Guy Robinson, Kingston University. Robert Loughran, University of Newcastle. Paul Tranter, University of New South Wales.

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