The Brazilians

Front Cover
Da Capo Press, 1995 - History - 540 pages
8 Reviews
A country warmly hospitable and surprisingly violent, physically beautiful, yet appallingly poor葉hese are the contrasts Joseph Page explores in The Brazilians, a monumental book on one of the most colorful and paradoxical places on earth.Once one of the strongest market economies in the world, Brazil now struggles to emerge from a deep economic and social crisis, the latest and deepest nose-dive in a giddy roller-coaster ride that Brazilians have experienced over the past three decades. Page examines Brazil in the context of this current crisis and the events leading up to it. In so doing, he reveals the unique character of the Brazilian people and how this national character has brought the country to where it is today葉eetering on the verge of joining the First World, or plunging into unprecedented environmental calamity and social upheaval. Not since Luigi Barzini痴 The Italians has a society been so deeply and accurately portrayed.
  

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Review: The Brazilians

User Review  - Chris - Goodreads

This book gives a great overview of customs and events that portray and shape Brazilian culture. I have a multi-cultural family (my wife is Brazilian) and this has given me insight into her background ... Read full review

Review: The Brazilians

User Review  - Suzanne Philp - Goodreads

Definitely an interesting read, althought a bit out of date now. Looking forward to checking out the country for myself! Read full review

Contents

Introducing Brazil
1
The Portuguese
35
The Africans
57
11
59
The Indians
85
The Immigrants
100
The Haves
121
The HaveNots
177
12
291
Chapter
321
Chapter
387
17
412
18
444
Chapter
486
Selected Bibliography
499
Copyright

The Culture of Brutality
229

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About the author (1995)

Joseph A. Page, a professor of law at the Georgetown University Law Center, is the author of Pern, which was translated into Spanish and became a South American bestseller. He also wrote The Revolution That Never Was and Bitter Wages.

Bibliographic information