Central India During the Rebellion of 1857 and 1858 ... (Google eBook)

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Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts, 1860 - India - 369 pages
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Page 98 - God, a night spent in arms, is of more avail than two months of fasting and prayer; whosoever falls in battle, his sins are forgiven; at the day of judgment his wounds shall be resplendent as vermilion, and odoriferous as musk; and the loss of his limbs shall be supplied by the wings of angels and cherubim.
Page 98 - is the key of heaven and hell ; a drop of blood shed in the cause of God, a night spent in arms, is of more avail than two months of fasting and prayer...
Page 299 - When you first marched, I told you that you as British soldiers had more than enough of courage for the work which was before you, but that courage without discipline was of no avail, and I exhorted you to let discipline be your watchword : you have attended to my orders. In hardships, in temptations, and in dangers you have obeyed your General, and have never left your ranks.
Page 158 - General Havelock and his brave troops have so long and so gloriously fought will now, under the blessing of Providence, be accomplished. The...
Page 299 - British soldiers, had more than enough of courage for the work which was before you, but that courage, without discipline, was of no avail ; and I exhorted you to let discipline be your watchword. You have attended to my orders. In hardships, in temptations, and in dangers, you have obeyed your General, and you never left your ranks.
Page 159 - The Major-General, therefore, in gratitude for and admiration of the brilliant deeds in arms achieved by General Havelock and his gallant troops, will cheerfully waive his rank on the occasion, and will accompany the force to Lucknow in his civil capacity as Chief Commissioner of Oude, tendering his military services to General Havelock as a volunteer.
Page 254 - ... the fire of the enemy waxed stronger, and amid the chaos of sounds of vollies of musketry and roaring of cannon, and hissing and bursting of rockets, stink-pots, infernal machines, huge stones, blocks of wood, and trees, — all hurled upon their devoted heads, — the men wavered for a moment, and sheltered themselves behind stones.
Page 84 - For he who fights and runs away May live to fight another day ; But he who is in battle slain Can never rise and fight again.
Page 232 - ... having been inhabited. There are traces of a door and window ; and a strong column has marks of iron grating upon it. The approach to these singular remains is difficult They are said to have been the abode of a giant called Isis.
Page 174 - Saugor road ; in this face was the gateway flanked by several square and round bastions. The wall to the north side was strengthened by an outwork looking like a second wall. Along each face were strong bastions commanding various points, and also in the four angles. Approach from the east and south was next to impossible ; approach from the west or town side almost as difficult...

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