Crime and its Social Context: Toward an Integrated Theory of Offenders, Victims, and Situations

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SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1994 - Social Science - 209 pages
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A study that explores possible connections among offenders, victims, and facilitating contexts by testing an integrated model of crime which explicitly recognizes each of these elements. It extends previous work by examining the predictive utility of both theories of criminality and theories of victimization in explaining aggregate rates and individuals' risks of predatory crime across different contexts. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
  

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Contents

Introduction to the Study of Crime
1
LINKING THEORY AND DATA
5
THE CURRENT STUDY
7
Theories of Criminality
9
THEORETICAL LEGACIES
10
THE CRIMINAL AS A UNIFYING CONCEPT
13
TWO MAJOR PROBLEMS SOME EXCEPTIONS AND NEW DIRECTIONS
18
CRIME AND THE COMMUNITY
21
The Empirical Distribution of Crime and Victimization
101
PHYSICAL LOCATION OF CRIME
103
TIME OF OCCURRENCE OF CRIME
111
SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF OFFENDERS AND VICTIMS
112
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
119
Predicting Crime Rates
121
CRIME RATES AND THEORETICALLY DERIVED VARIABLES
122
VARIATION IN THE PREDICTORS OF CRIME RATES
134

SOME HYPOTHESES
26
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
27
Theories of Victimization and Criminal Opportunities
29
HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS FOR CURRENT VICTIMIZATION THEORIES
30
THE LIFESTYLEEXPOSURE THEORY OF VICTIMIZATION
32
THE ROUTINE ACTIVITY THEORY
35
ALTERNATIVE THEORETICAL MODELS
39
CONTEXTUAL EFFECTS IN MODELS OF VICTIMIZATION
44
MAJOR CONCEPTS IN VICTIMIZATION THEORIES
46
PROBLEMS WITH PREVIOUS EVALUATIONS OF VICTIMIZATION THEORIES
52
SUMMARY AND RESEARCH HYPOTHESES
56
An Integrated Perspective
59
COMPATIBILITY OF THEORIES OF CRIMINALITY AND VICTIMIZATION
60
A HEURISTIC MODEL
63
SUMMARY
72
Data Sources for Evaluating Criminological Theories
73
UCR DATA AND CENSUS REPORTS
74
NATIONAL CRIME SURVEYS
77
SEATTLE TELEPHONE SURVEY
79
MEASURES OF MAJOR CONCEPTS
84
ANALYTIC PROCEDURES
93
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
94
MEASURES OF CONCEPTS AND DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS
95
THE VALUE OF THEORETICAL INTEGRATION
138
CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS
139
Predicting Individuals Risks of Victimization
141
CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS
147
Crime and Context
149
THE IMPORTANCE OF CONTEXTUAL EFFECTS
151
MAIN AND MEDIATIONAL EFFECTS OF CONTEXTUAL FACTORS
152
INTERACTIONS BETWEEN CONTEXTUAL AND INDIVIDUAL FACTORS
153
CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS
162
Summary and Implications
165
IMPLICATIONS FOR MACROLEVEL THEORIES OF CRIMINALITY
167
IMPLICATIONS FOR THEORIES OF VICTIMIZATION
168
IMPLICATIONS FOR A GENERAL THEORY OF CRIME
170
IMPLICATIONS OF DATA LIMITATIONS FOR TESTING THEORIES
172
IMPLICATIONS FOR CRIME CONTROL POLICY
174
CRIMINAL PROPENSITIES AND THE SOCIAL CONTEXT
177
CONCLUSIONS
179
NOTES
181
BIBLIOGRAPHY
189
AUTHOR INDEX
203
SUBJECT INDEX
207
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About the author (1994)

Terance D. Miethe is Associate Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Robert F. Meier is Professor in the Department of Sociology at Iowa State University.

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