A Political Economy of the Middle East

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Westview Press, Apr 24, 2009 - History - 496 pages
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This integrated, analytic text presents a comprehensive analysis of the transformation of the political economy of development in the contemporary Middle East over the past several decades. Extensively rewritten and revised, the third edition of A Political Economy of the Middle East retains a focus on the interaction of economic development processes, state systems, and social actors even as it also: Documents the many changes in demography, education, labor markets, urbanization, water and agriculture, and international labor migration in the Middle East in recent years; Considers the effect of rising oil prices on reinforcement of authoritarian governance in the region; Refines its assessment of “the Washington Consensus” to provide a more nuanced approach to the issue of the shifting balance of state and market in economic growth and reform (in an entirely rewritten Chapter 9); Presents Islamism as a vital force in the region that is nonetheless a vast, diverse social movement with many conflicting participants (in a wholly revised Chapter 14).
  

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Review: A Political Economy of the Middle East

User Review  - Gaurang Desai - Goodreads

Borrowed this book from the library when I first first moved to the ME. The country-specific analysis provided a good starting point for understanding the Arab spring which started a few months after I got here. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Notes
261
URBAN POLITICAL ECONOMY
264
The Process of Urbanization
268
Housing and Infrastructure
270
Poverty and Distribution of Income
274
Urban Politics and Political Violence
280
Notes
287
POLITICAL REGIMES AS VIEWED BY THEMSELVES AND OTHERS
289

Conclusion
42
ECONOMIC GROWTH AND STRUCTURAL CHANGE
44
The Natural Resource Base
46
Oil Supply Demand and Economic Rents
50
Patterns of Economic Growth
57
Conclusion
65
Notes
69
THE IMPACT OF DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE
71
Comparative Demographic Patterns
72
The Economic Consequences of Demographic Change
84
The Politics of Young Populations
89
The Politics of Differential Fertility
90
Rapid Population Growth and the WouldBe Middle Class
94
Conclusion
96
Notes
97
HUMAN CAPITAL HEALTH EDUCATION AND LABOR MARKETS
98
Health Conditions
99
Educational Systems
112
Labor Markets
133
Conclusion
141
Notes
142
WATER AND FOOD SECURITY
144
The Food Gap
147
Policy Constraints to Output Growth
156
Water and the Imperative of a New Food Security Strategy
165
Conclusion
176
Notes
177
THE EMERGENCE OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR
179
The State as Architect of Structural Transformation
180
Ataturk and the Turkish Pardigm
181
Replicating the Paradigm
185
State Capitalism the State Bourgeoisie and the Process of Accumulation
206
Notes
209
CONTRADICTIONS OF STATELED GROWTH
211
The Continued Dominance of PublicSector Enterprise
215
The Political Economy of Structural Adjustment
218
Notes
227
REMIXING MARKET AND STATE THE UNCERTAIN CAREER OF THE WASHINGTON CONSENSUS
228
A Survey of Country Experiences
233
Conclusion
260
Socialist Republics
291
Liberal Monarchies
311
Establishes and WouldBe Democracies
316
The Islamic Republics
320
Some Speculations
322
Notes
324
SOLIDARISM AND ITS ENEMIES
325
Small Groups and Clientelist Politics
326
The Failure of Parties
328
The Tenets of Solidarism
330
The Failure of Ideology
338
The Islamist Challenge
339
Democracy Without Democrats?
341
Conclusion
343
THE MILITARY AND THE STATE
344
Good Guys or Bad Guys?
348
The Economic Weight of the Military
349
The Military and Nation Building
357
The Regular Military and CiviliansinArms
358
Conclusion
360
Notes
361
IS ISLAM THE SOLUTION?
362
Coalitions of Social Actors
365
Collective Action
368
Islamist Economic Thought and Practice
372
Islamists in Power
378
Conclusion
382
Notes
383
REGIONAL ECONOMIC INTEGRATION AND LABOR MIGRATION
385
An Overview
388
To the European Union
389
To the Gulf
390
The Impact of Labor Migration on Sending Countries
394
The Impact of Migration on Receiving Countries
402
Conclusion
405
CONCLUSION
407
References
415
Index
451
Copyright

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Page 332 - Party follows, in the meantime, a way parallel to and in harmony with all the modern nations in the way of progress and development, and in international contacts and relations. (c) The source of Will and Sovereignty is the Nation. The Party considers it an important principle that this Will and Sovereignty be used to regulate the proper fulfillment of the mutual duties of the citizen to the State and of the State to the citizen.
Page xviii - OECD Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development OPEC Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries...
Page 230 - The lessons of history are clear: market economies, not command-and-control economies with the heavy hand of government, are the best way to promote prosperity and reduce poverty.
Page 332 - ... (populist). It is one of our main principles to consider the people of the Turkish Republic, not as composed of different classes, but as a community divided into various professions according to the requirements of the division of labour for the individual and social life of the Turkish people. The farmers, handicraftsmen, labourers and workmen, people exercising free professions, industrialists, merchants, and public servants are the main groups of work constituting the Turkish community. The...
Page 342 - With the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, our security environment has undergone profound transformation.
Page 332 - ... constituting the Turkish community. The functioning of each of these groups is essential to the life and happiness of the others and of the community. The aims of our Party, with this principle, are to secure social order and solidarity instead of class conflict, and to establish harmony of interests. The benefits are to be proportionate to the aptitude and to the amount of work.
Page xviii - UNICEF United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund USAID United States Agency for International Development...
Page 183 - (c) Although considering individual enterprise and effort as a basic idea, we desire to have the Government take an active interest, especially in the economic field, and to operate as far as possible in matters that lend themselves to the safeguarding of vital and general interests, or in short, that the Government ensure the welfare of the nation and the prosperity of the State.
Page 97 - The total fertility rate represents the number of children that would be born to a woman if she were to live to the end of her childbearing years and bear children at each age in accordance with prevailing age-specific fertility rates.

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