Draft of the Constitution of Virginia as finally adopted by the Convention: and referred to the Committee on final revision and adjustment of the various provisions of the Constitution that may be agreed upon, and upon the schedule, Volume 591, Issue 15 (Google eBook)

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J. H. O'Bannon, superintendent public printing, 1902 - Constitutions - 55 pages
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Page 5 - That religion, or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence, and therefore all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience...
Page 3 - That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when they enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity, namely, the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 4 - That all power of suspending laws, or the execution of laws, by any authority, without consent of the representatives of the people, is injurious to their rights, and ought not to be exercised.
Page 3 - That all power is vested in, and consequently derived from the people; that magistrates are their trustees and servants, and at all times amenable to them.
Page 4 - That in all capital or criminal prosecutions a man hath a right to demand the cause and nature of his accusation, to be confronted with the accusers and witnesses, to call for evidence in his favor, and to a speedy trial by an impartial jury of his vicinage, without whose unanimous consent he cannot be found guilty...
Page 5 - That no free government, or the blessing of liberty can be preserved to any people but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, frugality, and virtue, and by frequent recurrence to fundamental principles.
Page 11 - No person except a citizen of the United States shall be eligible to the office of Governor...
Page 3 - A Declaration of Rights made by the Representatives of the good People of Virginia, assembled in full and free Convention, which rights to pertain to them and their posterity as the basis and foundation of government.
Page 3 - That no man, or set of men, are entitled to exclusive or separate emoluments or privileges from the community, but in consideration of public services ; which not being descendible, neither ought the offices of magistrate, legislator, or judge, to be hereditary.
Page 4 - That all elections ought to be free, and that all men having sufficient evidence of permanent common interest with, and attachment to, the community, have the right of suffrage...

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