Principles of Logic (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1916 - 431 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
15
III
39
IV
67
V
77
VI
92
VII
105
VIII
121
XIV
215
XV
235
XVI
252
XVII
264
XVIII
289
XIX
310
XX
320
XXI
337

IX
137
X
150
XI
169
XII
187
XIII
203
XXII
354
XXIII
363
XXIV
380
XXV
395

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Popular passages

Page 273 - The only proof capable of being given that an object is visible, is that people actually see it. The only proof that a sound is audible, is that people hear it: and so of the other sources of our experience. In like manner, I apprehend, the sole evidence it is possible to produce that anything is desirable, is that people do actually desire it.
Page 418 - Matters of fact, which are the second objects of human reason, are not ascertained in the same manner; nor is our evidence of their truth, however great, of a like nature with the foregoing. The contrary of every matter of fact is still possible; because it can never imply a contradiction, and is conceived by the mind with the same facility and distinctness, as if ever so conformable to reality.
Page 404 - God himself who has created it, and without enducing them from any other source than from certain germs of truths naturally existing in our minds. In the second place, I examined what were the first and most ordinary effects that could be deduced from these causes; and it...
Page 241 - The Law of Causation, the recognition of which is the main pillar of inductive science, is but the familiar truth that invariability of succession is found by observation to obtain between every fact in nature and some other fact which has preceded It...
Page 321 - If two or more instances of the phenomenon under investigation have only one circumstance in common, the circumstance in which alone all the instances agree is the cause (or effect) of the given phenomenon.
Page 153 - The former of these propositions is not a definition at all: the latter is a mere nominal definition, or explanation of the use and application of a term. The first is susceptible of truth or falsehood, and may therefore be made the foundation of a train of reasoning.
Page 241 - If this be actually done, the principle which we are now considering, that of the uniformity of the course of nature, will appear as the ultimate major premise of all inductions...
Page 347 - ... the squares of the periodic times are as the cubes of the distances from the common centre, the centripetal forces will be inversely as the squares of the distances.
Page 322 - If two or more instances in which the phenomenon occurs have only one circumstance in common, while two or more instances in which it does not occur have nothing in common save the absence of that circumstance, the circumstance in which alone the two sets of instances differ is the effect, or the cause, or an indispensable part of the cause, of the phenomenon.
Page 272 - Kingston, had I but served my God as diligently as I have served my king, He would not have given me over in my grey hairs.

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