Making America: A History of the United States, Brief

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Cengage Learning, Jan 1, 2010 - History - 864 pages
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MAKING AMERICA: A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, BRIEF FIFTH EDITION, presents history as a dynamic process shaped by human expectations, difficult choices, and often the surprising consequences. With this focus on history as a process, MAKING AMERICA encourages students to think historically and to develop into citizens who value the past. The clear chronology, straightforward narrative, and strong thematic structure emphasize communication over intimidation, and appeal to students of varied learning levels. The Brief Fifth Edition retains a hallmark feature of the MAKING AMERICA program: pedagogical tools that allow students to master complex material and enable them to develop analytical skills. Every chapter has chapter outlines, chronologies, focus questions, and in-text glossaries to provide guidance throughout the text. A new feature called Investigating America gets to the heart of learning history: reading and analyzing primary sources. The text's new open, inviting design allows students to access and use pedagogy to improve learning. Available in the following split options: MAKING AMERICA, Brief Fifth Edition (Chapters 1-30), ISBN: 978-0-618-47139-3; Volume I: To 1877 (Chapters 1-15), ISBN: 978-0-618-47140-9; Volume II: Since 1865 (Chapters 15-30), ISBN: 978-0-618-47141-6.
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Contents

Making a New World to 1588
1
A Continent on the Move 14001725
26
Founding the English Mainland Colonies 15851732
49
The English Colonies in the Eighteenth Century 16891763
74
Deciding Where Loyalties Lie 17631776
98
Recreating America Independence and a New Nation 17751783
123
Competing Visions of the Virtuous Republic 17701796
147
The Early Republic 17961804
172
Economic Crash and Political Upheaval 18901900
453
The Progressive Era 19001917
476
The United States in a World at War 19131920
502
Prosperity Decade 19201928
527
The Great Depression and the New Deal 19291939
554
Americas Rise to World Leadership 19291945
579
Truman and Cold War America 19451952
606
Quest for Consensus 19521960
631

Increasing Conflict and War 18051815
195
The Rise of a New Nation 18151836
220
The Great Transformation Growth and Expansion 18281848
246
Responses to the Great Transformation 18281848
270
Sectional Conflict and Shattered Union 18481860
297
A Violent Choice Civil War 18611865
324
Reconstruction High Hopes and Shattered Dreams 18651877
351
An Industrial Order Emerges 18651880
377
Becoming an Urban Industrial Society 18801890
402
Conflict and Change in the West 18651902
428
Great Promises Bitter Disappointments 19601968
656
America Under Stress 19671976
681
Facing Limits 19761992
707
Entering a New Century 19922009
734
Suggested Readings
1
Documents
13
Presidential Elections
25
Index
1
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Carol Berkin received her undergraduate degree from Barnard College and her PhD from Columbia University. Her dissertation won the Bancroft Award. She is now presidential professor of history at Baruch College and the Graduate Center of City University of New York. She has written JONATHAN SEWALL: ODYSSEY OF AN AMERICAN LOYALIST (1974), FIRST GENERATIONS: WOMEN IN COLONIAL AMERICA (l996), A BRILLIANT SOLUTION: INVENTING THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTION (2002), and REVOLUTIONARY MOTHERS: WOMEN IN THE STRUGGLE FOR AMERICA'S INDEPENDENCE (2005). She has edited WOMEN OF AMERICA: A HISTORY (with Mary Beth Norton, 1979); WOMEN, WAR AND REVOLUTION (with Clara M. Lovett, 1980); WOMEN'S VOICES, WOMEN'S LIVES: DOCUMENTS IN EARLY AMERICAN HISTORY (with Leslie Horowitz, 1998); and LOOKING FORWARD/LOOKING BACK: A WOMEN'S STUDIES READER (with Judith Pinch and Carole Appel, 2005). She was contributing editor on southern women for THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF SOUTHERN CULTURE and has appeared in the PBS series "Liberty! The American Revolution," "Ben Franklin," and "Alexander Hamilton," and in The History Channel's "Founding Fathers." Professor Berkin chaired the Dunning Beveridge Prize Committee for the American Historical Association, the Columbia University Seminar in Early American History, and the Taylor Prize Committee of the Southern Association of Women Historians. She served on the program committees for both the Society for the History of the Early American Republic and the Organization of American Historians. She has served on the Planning Committee for the U.S. Department of Education's National Assessment of Educational Progress, and she chaired the CLEP Committee for Educational Testing Service. She serves on the Board of Trustees of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and the National Council for History Education.

Christopher L. Miller received his BS degree from Lewis and Clark College and his PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is currently associate professor of history at the University of Texas-Pan American. He is the author of PROPHETIC WORLDS: INDIANS AND WHITES ON THE COLUMBIA PLATEAU (1985), which was republished in 2003 as part of the "Columbia Northwest Classics Series" by the University of Washington Press. His articles and reviews have appeared in numerous scholarly journals and anthologies as well as standard reference works. Dr. Miller also is active in contemporary Indian affairs. He served, for example, as a participant in the American Indian Civics Project funded by the Kellogg Foundation. He has been a research fellow at the Charles Warren Center for Studies in American History at Harvard University and was the Nikolay V. Sivachev Distinguished Chair in American History at Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russia). Professor Miller also has been active in projects designed to improve history teaching, including programs funded by the Meadows Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, and other agencies.

Robert W. Cherny received his BA from the University of Nebraska and his MA and PhD from Columbia University. He is professor of history at San Francisco State University. His books include COMPETING VISIONS: A HISTORY OF CALIFORNIA (with Richard Griswold del Castillo, 2005); AMERICAN POLITICS IN THE GILDED AGE, 1868-1900 (1997); SAN FRANCISCO, 1865-1932: POLITICS, POWER, AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (with William Issel, 1986); A RIGHTEOUS CAUSE: THE LIFE OF WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN (1985, 1994); and POPULISM, PROGRESSIVISM, AND THE TRANSFORMATION OF NEBRASKA POLITICS, 1885-1915 (1981). He is coeditor of AMERICAN LABOR AND THE COLD WAR: UNIONS, POLITICS, AND POSTWAR POLITICAL CULTURE (with William Issel and Keiran Taylor, 2004). His articles on politics and labor in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries have appeared in journals, anthologies, and historical dictionaries and encyclopedias. In 2000, he and Ellen Du Bois coedited a special issue of the "Pacific Historical Review" that surveyed women's suffrage movements in nine locations around the Pacific Rim. He has been an NEH Fellow, Distinguished Fulbright Lecturer at Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russia), and Visiting Research Scholar at the University of Melbourne (Australia). He has served as president of H-Net (an association of more than 100 electronic networks for scholars in the humanities and social sciences), the Society for Historians of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, and the Southwest Labor Studies Association; as treasurer of the Organization of American Historians; and as a member of the council of the American Historical Association, Pacific Coast Branch.

Born in Riverside, California, James L. Gormly received a B.A. from the University of Arizona and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut. He is now professor of history and chair of the history department at Washington and Jefferson College. He has written THE COLLAPSE OF THE GRAND ALLIANCE (1970) and FROM POTSDAM TO THE COLD WAR (1979). His articles and reviews have appeared in DIPLOMATIC HISTORY, THE JOURNAL OF AMERICAN HISTORY, THE AMERICAN HISTORICAL REVIEW, THE HISTORIAN, THE HISTORY TEACHER, and THE JOURNAL OF INTERDISCIPLINARY HISTORY.

Born and raised in Phoenix, Arizona, Douglas R. Egerton received his undergraduate degree from Arizona State University and his M.A. and Ph.D. from Georgetown University. He is professor of history at Le Moyne College. His books include YEAR OF METEORS: THE ELECTION OF 1860 AND THE SECESSION WINTER (2010); DEATH OR LIBERTY: AFRICAN AMERICANS AND REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA (2009); THE ATLANTIC WORLD: A HISTORY, 1400-1888 (with Alison Games, Kris Lane, and Donald R. Wright, 2007); REBELS, REFORMERS & AND REVOLUTIONARIES: COLLECTED ESSAYS AND SECOND THOUGHTS (2002); HE SHALL GO OUT FREE: THE LIVES OF DENMARK VESEY (1999); GABRIEL'S REBELLION: THE VIRGINIA SLAVE CONSPIRACIES OF 1800 & 1802 (1993); and CHARLES FENTON MERCER AND THE TRIAL OF NATIONAL CONSERVATISM (1989). He was script consultant and on-camera commentator for two PBS series, "Africans in America" (1998) and "This Far By Faith: Stories of African American Religion" (2003). His articles on race and politics in early America have appeared in journals, anthologies, and encyclopedias. Professor Egerton served on the dissertation prize committee for the Southern Historical Association, and the book and article prize committees for the Society of Historians of the Early Republic. He has served on the editorial boards of the JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC and THE HISTORIAN, and he was awarded the John Adams Chair (Netherlands) Fulbright Scholar Distinguished Lecturing Award.

Professor of history and history education director at Pittsburg (Kansas) State University. She has received her Ph.D. from the University of North Texas as well as a number of prestigious teaching and technology grants including: Teaching American History Grant from the U.S. Department of Education; and Improving Teacher Quality Grant for Assessment from Pittsburg State University.

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