A History of the Transport Service: Adventures and Experiences of United States Transports and Cruisers in the World War (Google eBook)

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George H. Doran Company, 1921 - World War, 1914-1918 - 268 pages
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To whom it may concern.
we have a book listing the officers of the war society of the cruiser and transport force dated july 1921. wirh the names of the officers and members along with the by
laws. the certificate of incorporation
the names and addresses of the directors.
james e porter
2917 n.e.madison st
peoria il.61603
 

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Page 28 - Previous to 1916 the idea of a United States overseas expeditionary force numbered by millions would have been generally regarded as a remote if not impossible contingency. Consequently no extensive peace-time preparations had been made for such an undertaking. The task of providing a transport fleet was, therefore, a pioneer work. Ships had to be obtained, officers and crews enrolled and trained. It was necessary to provide docks, storehouses, lighters and tugs, coaling equipment, repair facilities,...
Page 26 - States ships, and all but 2^2 per cent. of these sailed in United States naval transports. All the troops carried in United States ships were escorted by United States men-of-war; that is, cruisers, destroyers, converted yachts, and other anti-submarine craft. Also for the most part the troops carried in British, French, and Italian ships were given safe conduct through the danger zones by United States destroyers. Roughly, 82^ per cent. of the maximum strength of the naval escorts provided incident...
Page 33 - The somewhat motley assemblage of ships finally gathered together for the first expedition did not long survive the duty imposed upon them. Some were torpedoed, others relegated to carry cargo and cattle, and some were subsequently wrecked or dropped out altogether because of unseaworthiness. Looking back to the first expedition of June 1917, it seems indeed that the hand of Providence must have been held over these 'arks' or the task never could have been accomplished.
Page 30 - ... for repairs. The United States armored cruiser San Diego struck a mine laid by a German submarine and was sunk. The service was not without hazard, as is shown by the fact that more than half of the war casualties in the United States Navy were suffered in the Cruiser and Transport Force. Nor were enemy guns and torpedoes the only menace — danger from fire and internal damage was enhanced by the machinations of enemy secret agents, and the likelihood of collision was increased by the necessity...
Page 30 - ... fortunate. In a measure this has been due to need of concentrating maximum naval escort protection on troopladen convoys. Frequently this necessitated lighter escort for the ships returning, and it was on these homewardbound vessels that the submarines scored their successes. The United States Naval Transports Antilles, President Lincoln, and Covington were torpedoed and sunk. The Finland and Mount Vernon were torpedoed, but were able to reach port for repairs. The United States armored cruiser...
Page 273 - ... decisive moment from the use of the weapon which will bring us victory. At any rate it will be expedient to consider what influence the entrance of America into the war on the side of our adversaries would have upon the trend of the war. As regards tonnage, this influence would be very negligible. It is not to be expected that more than a small fraction of the tonnage of the Central Powers lying in America and many other neutral harbors could then be enlisted for the traffic to England. For the...
Page 152 - Of unnamed heroes in the ships— of waves spreading and spreading far as the eye can reach, Of dashing spray, and the winds piping and blowing, And out of these a chant for the sailors of all nations, Fitful, like a surge. Of sea-captains young or old, and the mates, and of all intrepid sailors, Of the few, very choice, taciturn, whom fate can never surprise nor death dismay...
Page 22 - I am also distressed at the fact that it appears to me to be impossible to provide enough ships to bring the American Army over in hundreds of thousands to France, and, after they are brought over, to supply the enormous amount of shipping which will be required to keep them full up with munitions, food and equipment.
Page 61 - Pershing's expeditionary force to France arrived safe today. As you know, the navy assumed the responsibility for the safety of these ships on the sea and through the danger zone. The ships themselves and their convoys were in the hands of the navy, and now that they have arrived, and carried, without the loss of a man, our soldiers who are the first to represent America in the battle for democracy, I beg leave to tender to you, to the Admiral and to the navy, the hearty thanks of the War Department...
Page 63 - ... as a remote if not impossible contingency. Consequently no extensive peace-time preparations had been made for such an undertaking. The task of providing a transport fleet was, therefore, a pioneer work. Ships had to be obtained, officers and crews enrolled and trained. It was necessary to provide docks, storehouses, lighters and tugs, coaling equipment, repair facilities, and all the varied machinery for operating and maintaining a large transportation service. An efficient administrative organization...

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