The Works of William Makepeace Thackeray, Volume 2 (Google eBook)

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Smith, Elder & Company, 1868 - English literature - 457 pages
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Page 160 - Moreover his mother made him a little coat, and brought it to him from year to year, when she came up with her husband to offer the yearly sacrifice.
Page 294 - Which, I wonder, brother reader, is the better lot, to die prosperous and famous, or poor and disappointed? To have, and to be forced to yield; or to sink out of life, having played and lost the game? That must be a strange feeling, when a day of our life comes and we say, " To-morrow, success or failure won't matter much: and the sun will rise, and all the myriads of mankind go to their work or their pleasure as usual, but I shall be out of the turmoil.
Page 381 - Isn't the whole course of life made up of such ? and suppose I had won her, should I not have been disenchanted the day after my victory ? Why pine, or be ashamed of my defeat ? " The more he thought of this long passage of his life, the more clearly he saw his deception. " I'll go into harness again...
Page 331 - English or American female will permit the word breeches to be pronounced in her chaste hearing. And yet, Madam, both are walking the world before our faces every day, without much shocking us. If you were to blush every time they went by, what complexions you would have ! It is only when...
Page 312 - ... its degree ; whose want of meanness makes them simple : who can look the world honestly in the face with an equal manly sympathy for the great and the small ? We all know a hundred whose coats are very well made, and a score who have excellent manners, and one or two happy beings who are what they call in the inner circles, and have shot into the very centre and bull's-eye of the fashion ; but of gentlemen how many ? Let us take a little scrap of paper and each make out his list.
Page 205 - Don't kill me, Rawdon," she said. He laughed savagely. — "I want to see if that man lies about the money as he has about me. Has he given you any?" "No," said Rebecca, "that is—" "Give me your keys," Rawdon answered, and they went out together. Rebecca gave him all the keys but one; and she was in hopes that he would not have remarked the absence of that. It belonged to the little desk which Amelia had given her in early days, and which she kept in a secret place. But Rawdon flung open boxes...
Page 73 - Handel and Haydn to the family of evenings, and engaged in a large piece of worsted work, as if she had been born to the business, and as if this kind of life was to continue with her until she should sink to the grave in a polite old age, leaving regrets and a great quantity of consols behind her — as if there were not cares and duns, schemes, shifts, and poverty, waiting outside the park gates, to pounce upon her when she issued into the world again " It isn't difficult to be a country gentleman's...
Page 310 - Fair scenes of peace and sunshine— noble purple mountains, whose crests are reflected in the magnificent stream — who has ever seen you, that has not a grateful memory of those scenes of friendly repose and beauty ? To lay down the pen, and even to think of that beautiful Rhineland makes one happy. At this time of summer evening, the cows are trooping down from the hills, lowing and with their bells tinkling, to the old town, with its old moats, and gates, and spires, and chestnut-trees, with...
Page 392 - Ah ! Vanitas Vanitatum ! which of us is happy in this world ? Which of us has his desire ? or, having it, is satisfied ? — Come, children, let us shut up the box and the pup pets, for our play is played out.
Page 175 - Rents would go down. Parties wouldn't be given any more. All the tradesmen of the town would be bankrupt. Wine, waxlights, comestibles, rouge, crinoline-petticoats, diamonds, wigs, LouisQuatorze gimcracks, and old china, park hacks, and splendid high-stepping carriage horses - all the delights of life, I say - would go to the deuce if people did but act upon their silly principles, and avoid those whom they dislike and abuse.

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