Philo of Alexandria: An Exegete for His Time

Front Cover
BRILL, 1997 - Religion - 332 pages
0 Reviews
Philo's writings are a comprehensive and important source of late Second Temple Judaism. This volume gives important insights into his exegetical works. The structure of the books and their exegetical ideas are seen here as being closely connected and his writings are analysed against the background of the history, variety and outlook of Alexandrian Jewry. Philo's exegesis is a meeting place between Jewish and Greek notions and ideas; tensions are reflected, such as those between particularism and universalism, between specific biblical and historical earthly events and general macro- and micro-cosmic principles, and between heavenly ascents and interpreted history and eschatology. In addition, glimpses are gained of community life in a Hellenistic Jewish community, especially of issues on the borderline between Jews and their non-Jewish surroundings. New Testament material illuminates Philo's broader Jewish context, and in turn Philo throws light on New Testament backgrounds.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Mystic? Philosopher? Exegete?
1
Philo and His World
14
The Historical Perspective
30
Reviewing and Rewriting Biblical Material
46
Rewritten Bible
63
Questions and Answers
80
On the Giants and On the Unchangeableness of God
102
The Allegorical Laws Book 1
124
Illegitimate and Legitimate Ascents
194
Reaching Out and Coming In
206
Man and Gods People within a Cosmic Context
225
Philanthropia and the Laws of Moses
243
A Conditioned Future Hope
261
Concluding Summary
282
Abbreviations 289
283
Bibliography 290
291

Proclamatio Graeca Hermeneutical Key
140
Tension and Influence
158
The Conflict
176
Indexes
301
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1997)

Peder Borgen, Ph.D., Dr. Theol., is Professor and Senior Research Fellow at the Department of Religious Studies, the University of Trondheim, Norway. He has published extensively on Hellenistic Judaism and on the New Testament, including "Bread from Heaven. An Exegetical Study of the Concept of Manna in the Gospel of John and the Writings of Philo," (Brill, 1965, reprinted 1981).