Horses Past and Present (Google eBook)

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Vinton, 1900 - Horses - 89 pages
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Page 44 - Anne; when a public-spirited individual left thirteen plates or purses to be run for at such places as the crown should appoint, upon condition that every horse should carry twelve stone for the best of three heats four miles. By this means a stronger horse was raised, who, if he was not good enough upon the race-course, made a hunter.
Page 40 - These coaches and caravans are one of the greatest mischiefs that hath happened of late years to the kingdom, mischievous to the public, destructive to trade, and prejudicial to lands. First, by destroying the breed of good horses, the strength of the nation, and making men careless of attaining to good horsemanship, a thing so useful and commendable in a gentleman.
Page 49 - And that the thirteen royal plates of one hundred guineas each, annually run for, as also the high prices that are constantly given for horses of strength and size, are sufficient to encourage breeders to raise their cattle to the utmost size and strength possible...
Page 65 - ... to bring together for a common object vast bodies of people in different parts of the country, and to promote intercourse between different classes of society; and because, without the stimulus which racing affords, it would be difficult, if not impossible, to maintain that purity of blood and standard of excellence which have rendered the breed of English horses superior to that of any other country in the world. The Committee would, however, consider these advantages more than problematical...
Page 21 - Percy, his lordship's son and heir. A gret doble trottynge hors, called a curtal, for his lordship to ride on out of townes. Another trottynge gambaldyn hors for his lordship to ride on "when he comes into towns. An amblynge hors for his lordship to journeye on daily. A proper amblynge little nag for his lordship when he goeth on hunting and hawking. A gret amblynge gelding, or trottynge gelding, to carry his male.
Page 44 - They were given upon the condition that each horse, mare or gelding should carry twelve stone weight, the best of three heats over a four-mile course. By this method a stronger and more useful breed...
Page 70 - Eosebery's committee of the house of lords ' to inquire into the condition of this country with regard to horses, and its capabilities of supplying any present or future demand for them...
Page 21 - First, gentyll horsys, to stand in my lord's stable, six. Item, palfreys of my ladis, to wit, oone for my lady, and two for her gentillwomen, and oone for her chamberer. Four hobys and nags for my lordys oone saddill viz. oone for my lorde, and oone to stay at home for my lorde. ' Item, chariot hors, to stand in my lordis stable yerely. Seven great trottynge horsys to draw in the chariott, and a nag for the chariott man...
Page 36 - Oliver Cromwell, with his accustomed sagacity, perceiving the vast benefit derived to the nation by the improvement of its breed of horses, the natural consequence of racing, patronised this already peculiarly national amusement; and we find, accordingly, that he kept a racing stud.
Page 44 - Anne, when a public spirited gentleman (observing inconvenience arising from this exclusiveness) left thirteen plates or purses to be run for at such places as the Crown should appoint. Hence they are called the King's or Queen's Plates or Guineas. They were given upon the condition that each horse, mare or gelding should carry twelve stone weight, the best of three heats over a four-mile course.

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