Killing Monsters: Why Children Need (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Basic Books, Aug 1, 2008 - SOCIAL SCIENCE - 272 pages
30 Reviews
From a veteran creator of children's entertainment, an insider's view of how even the most violent games and TV shows can help children conquer fears and develop a bold sense of self.
  

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Review: Killing Monsters: Our Children's Need For Fantasy, Heroism, and Make-Believe Violence

User Review  - Christian - Goodreads

This is an important book, one that should be read by every parent and teacher. In clear language it lays out what most kids and geeks intuitively know - that violence in toys & cartoons & games doesn ... Read full review

Review: Killing Monsters: Our Children's Need For Fantasy, Heroism, and Make-Believe Violence

User Review  - Cristiano Santos - Goodreads

Whenever I'm asked about what's the earliest memory of my childhood that I recall, I always say that it is me, a 4-5 years old boy, sitting on the living room ground playing video games in a very ... Read full review

Contents

Being Strong
1
Seeing What Were Prepared to See
23
The Magic Wand
45
The Good Fight
65
Girl Power
77
Calming the Storm
97
Fantasy and Reality
113
The Courage to Change
129
Vampire Slayers
149
Shooters
165
Model Mirror and Mentor
183
Not So Alone
205
Growing Up
219
Notes
233
Index
251
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

A Biography of Sorts I've been writing stuff on and off all my adult life. Forty years. I've worked at it, sweated over it, worried about rhythm and cadence and the efficacy of individual words in individual sentences. I've come up with a voice that feels reasonably casual and credible enough to say true stuff, but still leaves room to throw in a little lyrical language when it's justified. I've always been pretty selective. Whatever I've written usually zips right along. What I've had to say has been somewhat germane to the affairs of human existence. Some of the stuff was probably even a little illuminating-like the stuff about Ginny Good in the early sixties, for example.

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