The beauties of England and Wales: or, Delineations, topographical, historical, and descriptive, of each county, Volume 12, Part 3 (Google eBook)

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Verner & Hood, 1815 - Architecture
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Page 585 - And Jacob rose up early in the morning, and took the stone that he had put for his pillows, and set it up for a pillar, and poured oil upon the top of it. And he called the name of that place Beth-el : but the name of that city was called Luz at the first.
Page 38 - I AB do sincerely promise and swear, That I will be faithful and bear true Allegiance to His Majesty King George...
Page 606 - Society has been established for the Relief of Widows and Orphans of Medical Men in London and its Vicinity.
Page 37 - I am well aware of the difficulties of the situation in which I shall be placed, but I shall rely with confidence upon the constitutional advice of an enlightened parliament, and the zealous support of a generous and loyal people. I will use all the means left to me to merit both. My Lords and Gentlemen, You will communicate this my...
Page 47 - The jury returned a verdict of wilful murder against some person or persons unknown, and the police were put on their mettle to discover the unknown and daring murderer.
Page 10 - Cambridgeshire, enforced the standing order of the House for the exclusion of strangers. This excited great dissatisfaction in the public ; and was made a subject of discussion in a debating society, which was in the habit of advertising, by bills posted up in the streets, questions to be debated amongst them, and the decisions which they came to. The question on this subject was, whether Mr.
Page 634 - Second) recovered, augmented, and secured the British Empire in Asia, Africa, and America, and restored the ancient reputation and influence of his country amongst the nations of Europe ; the citizens of London have unanimously voted this Bridge to be inscribed with the name of WILLIAM PITT.
Page 39 - ... the Archbishop of Canterbury ; and the rest, according to the order in which they sat at the long table, advanced to the chair on both sides. This imposing ceremony being closed, a short Lev.ee took place in the Drawing Room, when his Royal Highness addressed himself to the Circle, and afterwards gave an andience to Mr. Perceval, who had the honour again of kissing his hand as first Lord of the Treasury, and Chancellor of the Exchequer. On the 13th of February the important intelligence was officially...
Page 564 - English theatre, was from the late Sir William D'Avenant. It being forbidden him in the rebellious times...
Page 465 - When the yearly fair is proclaimed, a tent is pitched, and after the ceremony is over, the mob begin to wrestle before them, two at a time, and the conquerors are rewarded by them, with money thrown from the tent. After this, a parcel of live rabbits are...

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