Sakamoto Ryōma and the Meiji Restoration

Front Cover
Columbia University Press, 1994 - History - 423 pages
2 Reviews

French rule in Syria and Lebanon coincided with the rise of colonial resistance around the world and with profound social trauma after World War I. In this tightly argued study, Elizabeth Thompson shows how Syrians and Lebanese mobilized, like other colonized peoples, to claim the terms of citizenship enjoyed in the European metropole. The negotiations between the French and citizens of the Mandate set the terms of politics for decades after Syria and Lebanon achieved independence in 1946.

Colonial Citizens highlights gender as a central battlefield upon which the relative rights and obligations of states and citizens were established. The participants in this struggle included not only elite nationalists and French rulers, but also new mass movements of women, workers, youth, and Islamic populists. The author examines the "gendered battles" fought over France's paternalistic policies in health, education, labor, and the press. Two important and enduring political structures issued from these conflicts:

First, a colonial welfare state emerged by World War II that recognized social rights of citizens to health, education, and labor protection.

Second, tacit gender pacts were forged first by the French and then reaffirmed by the nationalist rulers of the independent states. These gender pacts represented a compromise among male political rivals, who agreed to exclude and marginalize female citizens in public life.

This study provides a major contribution to the social construction of gender in nationalist and postcolonial discourse. Returning workers, low-ranking religious figures, and most of all, women to the narrative history of the region -- figures usually omitted -- Colonial Citizens enhances our understanding of the interwar period in the Middle East, providing needed context for a better understanding of statebuilding, nationalism, Islam, and gender since World War II.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Sakamoto Ryoma and the Meiji Restoration

User Review  - Gerald Kinro - Goodreads

The book gives a good account of the people, events and the forces that led to the end of the Tokugawa shogunate and ushered Japan into the modern era. One of the major players was Sakamoto Ryoma ... Read full review

Review: Sakamoto Ryoma and the Meiji Restoration

User Review  - Jashamsulnizam Md Jani - Goodreads

This book gives a great overview of the facts about Sakamoto Ryoma's life, Nakaoka Shintaro's life and the Meiji Restoration. I feel like this would be a great supplement for fact checking for anyone ... Read full review

Contents

III
3
V
20
VI
36
VII
51
IX
67
X
77
XI
93
XII
95
XXIX
241
XXX
252
XXXI
259
XXXII
271
XXXIII
272
XXXIV
278
XXXV
286
XXXVI
294

XIII
104
XIV
124
XV
137
XVI
153
XVII
154
XVIII
160
XIX
166
XX
178
XXI
185
XXII
186
XXIII
195
XXIV
204
XXV
211
XXVI
223
XXVII
224
XXVIII
232
XXXVII
304
XXXVIII
312
XL
317
XLI
326
XLII
335
XLIII
342
XLIV
347
XLV
355
XLVI
368
XLVII
379
XLVIII
382
XLIX
389
L
401
LI
417
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1994)

Joseph Roach is professor of English at Tulane University. He is the author of The Player's Passion: Studies in the Science of Acting, which won the Barnard Hewitt Award, and coeditor, with Janeele Reinelt, of Critical Theory and Performance.

Bibliographic information