Youatt on the Structure and the Diseases of the Horse with Their Remedies: Also, Practical Rules to Buyers, Breeders, Breakers, Smiths, Etc., Being the Most Important Parts of the English Ed. of "Youatt on the Horse" Somewhat Simplified (Google eBook)

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Miller, Orton & Company, 1857 - Horses - 483 pages
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Contents

I
17
II
44
III
68
IV
99
V
136
VI
145
VII
153
VIII
169
XIV
271
XV
293
XVI
302
XVII
333
XVIII
343
XIX
359
XX
370
XXI
385

X
206
XI
215
XII
237
XIII
246
XXII
405
XXIII
420
XXIV
435

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Page iii - Books that you may carry to the fire, and hold readily in your hand, are the most useful after all. A man will often look at them, and be tempted to go on, when he would have been frightened at books of a larger size, and of a more erudite appearance.
Page 432 - ... have a right to recover the difference between the value of a sound horse and one with such defects as existed at the time of the warranty ; or he...
Page 108 - ... or if there is some of the redness of inflammation, it will have a purple tinge : but there will never be the faint pink blush of health, or the intense and vivid red of usual inflammation. Spots of ulceration will probably appear on the membrane covering the cartilage of the nose — not mere sore places, or streaks of abrasion, and quite superficial, but small ulcers, unusually approaching to a circular form, deep, and with the edges abrupt and prominent.
Page 382 - ... be more frequent and more dangerous. The way to cure him is to go on, turning as little as possible out of the road, giving a harsh word or two, and a gentle touch with the spur, and then taking no more notice of the matter. After a few times, whatever may have been the object which he chose to select as the pretended cause of affright, he will pass it almost without notice. In page 243, under the head "breaking in...
Page 27 - ... that had been his father's, to his eldest son and told him to appreciate their value, and never lie down to rest until he had rubbed them both as bright as a looking-glass. In the first skirmish in which the young man was engaged he was killed, and the mare fell into the hands of the enemy. When the news reached the old man, he exclaimed that " life was no longer worth preserving, for he had lost both his son and his mare, and he grieved for one as much as the other ;" and he immediately sickened...
Page 281 - There are few lamenesses in which the absolute and long-continued rest is more requisite. It leaves the parts materially weakened, and, if the horse is soon put to work again, the lameness will frequently return. No horse that has had curbs, should be put even to ordinary work in less than a month after the apparent cure ; and, even then, he should very gradually resume his former habits. A horse with a curb is manifestly unsound.
Page 43 - Tis triumph all and joy. Now, my brave youths, Now give a loose to the clean generous steed ; Flourish the whip, nor spare the galling spur ; But in the madness of delight, forget Your fears.
Page 150 - ... larger surface for the attachment of the muscles of the back, and they act at greater mechanical advantage. A slanting direction of the shoulder gives, also, much mechanical advantage, as well as an easy and pleasant action, and a greater degree of safety. It must not, however, exist in any considerable degree in the horse of draught, and particularly of heavy draught.
Page 28 - Arab to his mare has often been told, but it comes home to the bosom of every one possessed of common feeling. " The whole stock of an Arab of the desert consisted of a mare. The French consul offered to purchase her in order to send her to his sovereign, Louis XIV. The Arab would have rejected the proposal at once with indignation and scorn ; but he was miserably |iocir.
Page 78 - The earliest and perhaps the most decisive symptom of the near approach of rabies in the horse, is a spasmodic movement of the upper lip, particularly of the angles of the lip. Close following on this, or contemporaneous with it, is the depressed and anxious countenance, and inquiring gaze, suddenly however lighted up and becoming fierce and menacing, from some unknown cause, or at the approach of a stranger. From time to time different parts of the frame — the eyes — the jaws — particular...

References from web pages

Catalogue of Rare Veterinary Books and Allied Subjects in Animal ...
1433, Youatt on the structure, and the diseases of the horse, with their remedies; also, practical rules to buyers, breeders, breakers, smiths, &c. ...
digital.lib.msu.edu/ projects/ vetmed/ html/ catalog_pages/ y.html

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