The Comedies of William Congreve

Front Cover
Kessinger Publishing, Apr 1, 2005 - Drama - 408 pages
2 Reviews
1927. Congreve's literary apprenticeship was served under the tutelage of John Dryden, the leading playwright of the day. William Congreve only wrote five plays before retiring from writing to work in government. Love for Love and his other plays showed a knack for writing urbane, scintillating wit that some say rivaled Moliere's. Contents: The Old Batchelor; The Double-Dealer; Love for Love; and The Way of the World. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: The Comedies of William Congreve

User Review  - Lynda - Goodreads

I love restoration comedies. They are full of wit and innuendo. I regret that Congreve did not put out more. Read full review

Review: The Comedies of William Congreve

User Review  - psm - Goodreads

one of the highlights of 17th century literature. quick-paced, witty, clever, sophisticated, comedies of sex and manners. a precursor to films like "his girl friday". brilliant. "love for love" and ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

References to this book

All Book Search results »

References from web pages

Congreve, William
ISBN 0415134315; Henderson, Anthony G. The Comedies of William Congreve: The Old Batchelour, Love for Love, The Double Dealer, The Way of the World (Plays ...
www.newworldencyclopedia.org/ entry/ William_Congreve

JSTOR: Recent Studies in the Restoration and Eighteenth Century
The Comedies of William Congreve: The Old Batchelour, The Double Dealer, Love for Love, The Way of the World. Ed. Anthony C. Henderson. ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0039-3657(198322)23%3A3%3C495%3ARSITRA%3E2.0.CO%3B2-W

About the author (2005)

William Congreve was a playwright. He was born in February 1670 in Bardsey Grange, England. Congreve attended Trinity College, Dublin, and was admitted to the Middle Temple to study law. Congreve completed his first play, The Old Bachelor, in 1690. He became associated with John Dryden, collaborating with him on translations of the satires of Juvenal and Persius in 1693. Congreve's second play, Love for Love, was also successful and Congreve became a manager of the theater that staged it. Other plays followed, including The Way of the World in 1700. Congreve died on January 19, 1729.

Bibliographic information