Glory in the Name (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Harper Collins, Oct 13, 2009 - Fiction - 432 pages
1 Review
Then call us Rebels if you will we glory in the name, for bending under unjust laws and swearing faith to an unjust cause, we count as greater shame. -- Richmond Daily Dispatch, May 12, 1862

April 12, 1861. With one jerk of a lanyard, one shell arching into the sky, years of tension explode into civil war. And for those men who do not know in which direction their loyalty calls them, it is a time for decisions. Such a one is Lieutenant Samuel Bowater, an officer of the U.S. Navy and a native of Charleston, South Carolina.

Hard-pressed to abandon the oath he swore to the United States, but unable to fight against his home state, Bowater accepts a commission in the nascent Confederate Navy, where captains who once strode the quarterdecks of the world's most powerful ships are now assuming command of paddle wheelers and towboats. Taking charge of the armed tugboat Cape Fear, and then the ironclad Yazoo River, Bowater and his men, against overwhelming odds, engage in the waterborne fight for Southern independence.

  

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Just finished "Glory in the name". A Novel about the Confederate navy in the American Civil War, written by Jim Nelson. I'm not normally that keen on the ACW but this book was excellent, it gave me a ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
9
Section 3
15
Section 4
20
Section 5
29
Section 6
35
Section 7
44
Section 8
52
Section 26
221
Section 27
226
Section 28
236
Section 29
249
Section 30
258
Section 31
266
Section 32
276
Section 33
283

Section 9
59
Section 10
67
Section 11
81
Section 12
85
Section 13
91
Section 14
101
Section 15
110
Section 16
119
Section 17
131
Section 18
140
Section 19
151
Section 20
162
Section 21
175
Section 22
187
Section 23
191
Section 24
202
Section 25
210
Section 34
291
Section 35
301
Section 36
315
Section 37
321
Section 38
329
Section 39
337
Section 40
344
Section 41
351
Section 42
357
Section 43
368
Section 44
377
Section 45
386
Section 46
397
Section 47
409
Section 48
417
Copyright

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Page 321 - New Orleans. Destroy the armed barriers which these deluded people have raised up against the power of the United States government, and shoot down those who war against the Union ; but cultivate with cordiality the first returning reason, which is sure to follow your success.
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Page 1 - We'd rather live as freemen dead, Than live in slavish fear. Then call us rebels, if you will — We glory in the name-, For bending under unjust laws, And swearing faith to an unjust cause, We count a greater shame.
Page 248 - SiR : We are aground. We have only two guns that will bear in the direction of the enemy. Shall I remain on board after the moon goes down, with my crippled ship and worn-out men ? Will you send me word what countersign my boats shall use if we pass near your ship ? While we have moonlight, would it not be better to leave the ship ? Shall I burn her when I leave her? .

About the author (2009)

James L. Nelson has served as a seaman, rigger, boatswain, and officer on a number of sailing vessels. He is the author of By Force of Arms, The Maddest Idea, The Continental Risque, Lords of the Ocean, and All the Brave Fellows -- the five books of his Revolution at Sea Saga. -- as well as The Guardship: Book One of the Brethren of the Coast. He lives with his wife and children in Harpswell, Maine.

Bibliographic information