The Ironic Defense of Socrates: Plato's Apology (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Jul 12, 2010 - Political Science
1 Review
This book offers a controversial interpretation of Plato's Apology of Socrates. By paying unusually close attention to what Socrates indicates about the meaning and extent of his irony, David Leibowitz arrives at unconventional conclusions about Socrates' teaching on virtue, politics, and the gods; the significance of his famous turn from natural philosophy to political philosophy; and the purpose of his insolent 'defense speech'. Leibowitz shows that Socrates is not just a colorful and quirky figure from the distant past but an unrivaled guide to the good life - the thoughtful life - who is as relevant today as in ancient Athens. On the basis of his unconventional understanding of the dialogue as a whole, and of the Delphic oracle story in particular, Leibowitz shows that the Apology is the key to the Platonic corpus, indicating how many of the disparate themes and apparently contradictory conclusions of the other dialogues fit together.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Title and Preliminary Considerations
2
2 Prooemium 17a118a6
8
3 Prothesis 18a719a7
39
4 Defense against the Charges of the First Accusers 19a824b2
49
5 Defense against the Present Accusers 24b328b2
116
6 Second Digression 28b334b5
137
7 Epilogue 34b635d8
154
8 Penalty Section 35e138b9
161
9 Final Speech 38c142a5
166
10 Conclusion
175
Short ignorespaces Titles
185
Bibliography
187
Index
193
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

David Leibowitz is currently Assistant Professor of Political Science at Kenyon College and has also taught at Michigan State University and the University of Toronto. He received his PhD from Harvard University.

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