Travels in Circassia, Krim-tartary, &c: including a steam voyage down the Danube, from Vienna to Constantinople, and round the Black sea, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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H. Colburn, 1839 - Black Sea - 415 pages
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Page 62 - Near this place we found a range of caverns, famous for producing the poisonous fly, too well known in Servia and Hungary under the name of the Golubacser fly. These singular and venomous insects, somewhat resembling musquitoes, generally make their appearance, during the first great heat of summer, in such numbers as to seem like vast volumes of smoke...
Page 374 - From thence we passed into an adjoining garden, solely appropriated to the celebration of the Feast of Tabernacles, and continued our promenade through the town, to a steep flight of steps, leading down to what is termed the Valley of Jehosaphat, situate in a chasm of the rocks. This is the cemetery of the sect, resembling a beautiful grove, shaded by the dark foliage of a thousand trees, forming a striking contrast to the white marble tombs, and gloomy beetling rocks that seem to threaten destruction...
Page 262 - ... spirit of hostility ; and their attacks, being now conducted with greater military skill and discipline, had proved more murderous to their invaders. They were also said to be commanded by an English officer, who had served in India. But the last, and to me the most extraordinary, piece of intelligence was, that the country was inundated with copies of a proclamation from the king of England, calling upon the Circassians to defend their country ; and that, in the event of their requiring assistance,...
Page 369 - After advancing some little way through the defile, our attention was attracted by a tremendous uproar; and, on turning a curve of the road, we came at once upon a gipsy village, presenting a scene not easily paralleled. Bears were bellowing, monkeys and children screaming, dogs barking, drums beating, pipers playing, women scolding, men fighting, and smiths and tinkers hammering, altogether forming a charivari which, fortunately for men's ears, does not often assail them. Nor was the appearance...
Page 62 - These singular and venomous insects, somewhat resembling mosquitos. generally make their appearance during the first great heat of the summer in such numbers as to appear like vast volumes of smoke. Their attacks are always directed against every description of quadruped, and so potent is the poison they communicate that even an ox is unable to withstand its influence, for he always expires in less than two hours. This results not so much from the virulence of the poison as that every vulnerable...
Page 23 - Bakony ; or the ravages committed by the dreadful monster, half-serpent, half-flying dragon, that lately rose out of the Balaton lake, together with the most veritable history of the re-appearance of the renowned Merman, who had inhabited for the last two years his own extensive domain, the Hansag marshes. All these astonishing marvels, besides hundreds of others, were listened to...
Page 331 - There were also full-length inscriptions on them, surmounted with the head of our Saviour, or a saint, which generally ran thus : ' Parmi Dey y par my Rey. Ne me tire pas sans raison, et ne me remets pas sans honneur.
Page 376 - Karaites also assert that our Saviour was a member of their community, and that he entertained the same opinion as themselves with respect to the interpolations of the rabbins : in support of which belief, they adduce his repeated...
Page 23 - ... interruption occurred, they glanced with scorn and contempt. Among crowds of Je,ws, Turks, Greeks, Armenians, Tyrolians, Germans, Sclavonians, Italians, and Hungarian peasants, were groups of Gipsies, their black matted locks shading their wild sun-burnt countenances, exhibiting their dancing-dogs, bears, and monkeys, or playing a lively tune for the amusement of the surrounding multitude, these itinerants being the popular musicians of Hungary. In another part of the fair, mountebanks on elevated...
Page 24 - Hungarian fair, so as to obtain a view of its rarities, was an undertaking of no little difficulty, on account of the immense pyramids of wool, hides, tobacco, and other raw materials, which ever stood in the way ; and as these articles were most tempting baits to the cupidity of the Jewish traders, they might constantly be seen making use of all their cajoling eloquence, while prevailing upon the artless peasant to dispose of his wares, at a price little more than nominal. When, however, the case...

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