Driving as I found it: what to drive [and] how to drive (Google eBook)

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Brentano's, 1891 - Transportation - 180 pages
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Page 71 - The virtues of this root are not sufficiently known, whether as contributing to the strength and endurance of the sound horse, or the rapid recovery of the sick one. To the healthy horse they should be given sliced in his chaff. Half a bushel will be a fair daily allowance. There is little provender of which the horse is fonder.
Page 172 - And who sing of it night and morn, But give me a coach with its rattling bars, And a guard who can blow his horn. How the girls all doat on the sight of a coach, And the dragsman's curly locks, As he rattles along with eleven and four And a petticoat on the box ; His box is his home, his teams...
Page 172 - ... night and morn, But give me a coach with its rattling bars, And a guard who can blow his horn. How the girls all doat on the sight of a coach, And the dragsman's curly locks, As he rattles along with eleven and four And a petticoat on the box ; His box is his home, his teams are his pride, And he ne'er looks downcast or forlorn ; And he lists to the musical sound of the bars, And a blast on the old mail horn. There was another song, ' The Tantivy Trot,' which had a great popularity.
Page 154 - ... effect this, a thoroughly practised breaksman is required. Now a man may be a very good coachman, though know very little of his business as a breaksman ; but the latter cannot be fit for his business unless he is a first-rate coachman : and he requires much more than this : he must perfectly understand the habits and tempers of young horses, and indeed of all horses : he must have a clear head, quick apprehension, good temper, great pre-sence of mind, strong nerves, strong but light hands, know...
Page 73 - ... binds down his farrier or surgeon to remove the shoes once at least in every month ; for if the contractor, by a heavy shoe and a little steel, can cause five or six weeks to intervene between the shoeings, he will do so, although the feet of the horse must necessarily suffer. The shoe should never be heavier than the work requires. An ounce or two in the weight of the shoe will sadly tell before the end of a hard day's work. This is acknowledged in the hunter's shoe, which is narrower and lighter...
Page 74 - ... and, therefore, the hinder shoes are made broader at the toe than the fore ones. Another good effect is produced by this, that, the hinder foot being shortened, there is less danger of over-reaching, forging, or clinking, and especially if the shoe is wider on the foot surface than on the ground one. The shoe is thus made to slope inward, and is a little within the toe of the crust. The shape of the hinder foot is somewhat different from that of the fore foot. It is straighter in the quarters,...
Page 22 - I should perhaps much surprise many persons by stating that a horse improperly bitted will sometimes set him kicking : they may say, " What on earth has his mouth to do with his heels ? " A great deal, with some horses. They say the devil is good-tempered when he is well pleased ; so am I, and so is a horse ; and while he is, he goes pleasantly and quietly. Now put a too severe bit in his mouth, and, what is ten times worse, put the reins into rude hands, his mouth gets punished : this naturally...
Page 71 - Carrots also improve the state of the skin. They form a good substitute for grass, and an excellent alterative for horses out of condition. To sick and idle horses they render grain unnecessary.
Page 33 - It is an idea, that no sensible or honorable man can seriously entertain. There is no more excuse for premeditated deception in the sale of a horse than there is in any other transaction. The moment a man can bring himself to think there is he will steal.
Page 25 - All seems easy to the bystanders, no difficulty appears, but this apparent ease shows the masterly hand that is at work. There is a kind of freemasonry among such men that enables them to detect the perfect coachman at a glance. A cast of the eye at the hands of each other on meeting is sufficient to show to each what the other intends doing. They know they will each do what they intend, though only an inch of spare room is between them.

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