Duffy's War: Fr. Francis Duffy, Wild Bill Donovan, and the Irish Fighting 69th in World War I (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Potomac Books, Inc., 2006 - Biography & Autobiography - 435 pages
1 Review
The legendary "Fighting 69th" took part in five major engagements during World War I. It served in the front lines for almost 170 days, suffering hundreds killed and thousands wounded. This highly decorated unit was inspired by its chaplain, the famous Father Francis Duffy (whose statue stands in Times Square), and commanded by the future leader of the OSS (predecessor of the CIA), "Wild Bill" Donovan. One of its casualties was the poet Joyce Kilmer.

Due in large part to the classic 1940 movie The Fighting 69th, starring James Cagney and Pat O'Brien (as Duffy), the unit still has strong name recognition. But until now, no one has recounted in detail the full story of this famous Irish outfit in World War I. The exciting Duffy's War brings to life the men's blue-collar neighborhoods--Irish mostly and Italian and overwhelmingly Catholic. These boys came from the East Side, the West Side, Hell's Kitchen, the Gashouse, and Five Points; from Brooklyn, Queens, Long Island City, and Staten Island; and from Father Duffy's own parish in the Bronx. They streamed out of the tenements and apartment houses, enlisting en masse. Brothers joined up, oftentimes three and four from one family.

Published during a resurgent interest in the doughboy experience of World War I, Duffy's War also tells the fascinating history of New York City and the Irish experience in America. With this book, Stephen L. Harris completes his outstanding trilogy on New York National Guard regiments in World War I.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jones120 - LibraryThing

Probably the best of the three books by Harris on the New York National Guard regiments in Wprld War I. Read full review

Contents

1 Give Me A Mans Job
1
2 Shall We Fight for England?
19
3 RainbowTheres the Name for the Division
31
4 Did You Ever Go Into an Irishmans Shanty?
55
5 Goodbye Broadway Hello France
69
6 Its a Huge Regiment Now
77
7 The People I Like Best Are the Wild Irish
89
8 A Willing Bright Strong Clean Lot
103
16 The Last Joy Ride Any of Usll Ever Get
233
17 All You Want Now Is Guts and Bayonets
249
18 I Guess I Have Been Born to Be Hanged
267
19 We Sure Hated to See Him Get Killed
281
20 I Have Been Very Happy in Command of the Regiment
297
21 Not a Fight But a Promenade
311
22 Over the River a Thousand Yawning Dead
331
23 You Expected to Have the Pleasure of Burying Me
349

9 Not a Gloomy Man in Town
113
10 Most Pitiful and Unsightly Bunch of Men I Have Ever Seen
123
11 We Are All Volunteers in This War
137
12 In the Wood They Call the Rouge Bouquet
153
13 Quiet Sectors Are Not Necessarily Quiet
177
14 From a Canny Scot to a Bold Irishman
193
15 It Will Be a Happy Day
209
24 We Looked Down from the Last Crest Above Sedan
361
We Want Him We Need Him He Has Earned It
373
Notes
381
Selected Bibliography
413
Index
423
About the Author
435
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Stephen L. Harris is the author of Duty, Honor, Privilege: New York's Silk Stocking Regiment and the Breaking of the Hindenburg Line (Brassey's, Inc., 2001), Harlem's Hell Fighters: The African-American 369th Infantry in World War I (Brassey's, Inc., 2003), and Duffy's War: Fr. Francis Duffy, Wild Bill Donovan, and the Irish Fighting 69th in World War I (Potomac Books, 2006). He lives in Weybridge, Vermont.

Bibliographic information