The hymns of Homer; the Batrachomyomachia; and two original poetical hymns (The shadow of night) by G. Chapman. With an intr. preface by S.W. Singer (Google eBook)

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1818
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Page l - He would have made a great epic poet, if indeed he has not abundantly shewn himself to be one; for his Homer is not so properly a translation as the stories of Achilles and Ulysses re-written.
Page viii - For although a Poet, soaring in the high region of his fancies with his garland and singing robes about him...
Page l - He could not go out of himself, as Shakspeare could shift at pleasure, to inform and animate other existences, but in himself he had an eye to perceive and a soul to embrace all forms and modes of being.
Page xlviii - D'Ambois upon the theatre; but when I had taken up what I supposed a fallen star, I found I had been cozened with a jelly ; nothing but a cold dull mass, which glittered no longer than it was shooting; a dwarfish thought, dressed up in gigantic words, repetition in abundance, looseness of expression, and gross hyperboles; the sense of one line expanded prodigiously into ten; and to sum up all, incorrect English, and a hideous mingle of false poetry and true nonsense; or, at best, a scantling of wit,...
Page 26 - Are newly worn; and as sweet poesy Will not be clad in her supremacy With those strange garments (Rome's hexameters), As she is English ; but in right prefers Our native robes (put on with skilful hands English heroics) to those antic garlands...
Page 26 - Prone to delivery, and to yield the weight Of her dear burthen, with a world of ease. When with her fair hand she a palm did seize. And staying her by it, stuck her tender knees Amidst the soft mead; that did smile beneath Her sacred labour, and the child did breathe The air in th
Page 23 - Cytheron did fry In sightful fury of a solemn fire) Ascend thy chariot, and make earth admire Thy old swift changes, made a young fix'd prime, O let thy beauty scorch the wings of time, That fluttering he may fall before thine eyes, And beat himself to death before he rise: And as...
Page 118 - Sometimes (In quite oppos'd capriccios) he climbs The hardest rocks, and highest; every way Running their ridges. Often will convey Himself up to a watch-tow'r's top, where sheep Have their observance: oft through hills as steep His goals he runs upon, and never rests.
Page xiv - ... of Oration as are most apt for the language into which they are converted.
Page xv - In a word, the nature of the man may account for his whole performance; for he appears from his preface and remarks to have been of an arrogant turn, and an enthusiast in poetry.

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