The Electrical Nature of Storms

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Oxford University Press, 1998 - Science - 422 pages
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Rapid progress during the last twenty years has created a host of new technologies for studying electrical storms, including lightning mapping systems, new radars, satellite sensors, and new ways of measuring electric field and particle charge. This book explains how these advances have revolutionized our understanding. The books provides substantial background material, making it accessible to a broad scientific audience.
  

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This was a very help ful to me in my science Project on the effects of electricity on the growth of ice crystals Thank You

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
23
Section 3
41
Section 4
48
Section 5
49
Section 6
76
Section 7
83
Section 8
85
Section 14
226
Section 15
236
Section 16
251
Section 17
289
Section 18
304
Section 19
308
Section 20
320
Section 21
357

Section 9
90
Section 10
118
Section 11
124
Section 12
140
Section 13
141
Section 22
363
Section 23
366
Section 24
369
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 402 - On the equilibrium of liquid conducting masses charged with electricity', Phil.
Page 380 - An experimental study of the remote location of lightning flashes using a VLF arrival time difference technique.
Page 378 - Extension of the Diendorfer-Uman lightning return stroke model to the case of a variable upward return stroke speed and a variable downward discharge current speed,
Page 379 - CH Gary, BP Hutzler, AR Eybert-Berard, PL Hubert, AC Meesters, PH Perroud, JH Hamelin, and JM Person w |g (1978). Research on artificially triggered lightning in France, IEEE Trans.
Page 380 - Seasonal variation of cloud-toground lightning flash characteristics in the coastal area of the Sea of Japan J.

References to this book

Electrostatics 2003
Morgan
Limited preview - 2004
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About the author (1998)

Donald MacGorman and W. David Rust are both at the National Severe Storms Laboratory.

Bibliographic information