Antiquities of the Southern Indians, Particularly of the Georgia Tribes (Google eBook)

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D. Appleton and Company, 1873 - Georgia - 532 pages
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Page 414 - Or chasms and watery depths; all these have vanished; They live no longer in the faith of reason. But still the heart doth need a language, still Doth the old instinct bring back the old names, And to yon starry world they now are gone, Spirits or gods, that used to share this earth With man as with their friend...
Page 274 - The Lake Dwellings of Switzerland and other Parts of Europe. By Dr. F. KELLER, President of the Antiquarian Association of Zurich. Translated and arranged by JE LEE, FSAFGS Author of 'Isca Silurum.
Page 1 - America, which lies from the most northern part of a stream or river there commonly called the Savannah, all along the sea coast to the southward, unto the most southern stream of a certain other great water or river called the Alatamaha, and westerly from the heads of the said rivers respectively in direct lines to the South Seas...
Page 117 - And scattered in the furrows lie The weapons of his rest, And there, in the loose sand, is thrown Of his large arm the mouldering bone.
Page 404 - ... inches from the tip of the beak to the end of the tail when spread as far as possible flat.
Page 307 - But previous to their carrying off their crops from the field, there is a large crib or granary, erected in the plantation, which is called the King's crib; and to this each family carries and deposits a certain quantity, according to his ability or inclination, or none at all if he so chooses...
Page 447 - They make earthen pots of very different sizes, so as to contain from two to ten gallons, large pitchers to carry water; bowls, dishes, platters, basons, and a prodigious number of other vessels of such antiquated forms, as would be tedious to describe, and impossible to name. Their method of glazing them, is, they place them over a large fire of smoky pitch pine, which makes them smooth black and firm.
Page 261 - Erratic boulders of flint are collected (and sometimes brought an immense distance), and broken with a sort of sledge-hammer made of a rounded pebble of horn-stone, set in a twisted withe, holding the stone, and forming a handle. The...
Page 389 - The second consists in a combat, to the sound of a kind of drum, which succeeds the songs, or rather joins them, harmonizing quite well. The dancer beckons to some brave to come and take the arms on the mat, and challenges him to fight to the sound of the drums; the other approaches, takes his bow and arrow, and begins a duel against the dancer who has no defence but the calumet. This spectacle is very pleasing, especially as it is always done in time, for one attacks, the other defends; one strikes,...
Page 262 - Philadelphia, 1860. thumb and two forefingers, places his chisel (or punch) on the point that is to be broken off; and a cooperator (a striker) sitting in front of him, with a mallet of very hard wood, strikes the chisel (or punch) on the upper end, flaking the flint off on the under side, below each projecting point that is struck.

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