Social Psychology: Goals in Interaction

Front Cover
Pearson, 2010 - Social psychology - 620 pages
4 Reviews
'Social Psychology' explores how social behavior is goal-directed and a result of interactions between the person and the situation.

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Review: Social Psychology: Goals in Interaction

User Review  - Shauna Durbin - Goodreads

This book is easy to understand and easy to read. I actually enjoyed reading a textbook! It is an overview if you will, of social psychology. It's not too in depth but it gives a good overview. Read full review

Review: Social Psychology: Goals in Interaction

User Review  - Ryan Lang - Goodreads

The textbook is a good overview of the topic, but is quite vague when it comes to hard facts, leaving much of the message ambiguous in meaning and with little cited scientific support. For a more in ... Read full review

About the author (2010)

CONTENTS:

1. Author Bios

2. A message from the authors

1. Author Bios:

Douglas T. Kenrick is a professor at Arizona State University. He received his B.A. from Dowling College and his Ph.D. from Arizona State University. He taught at Montana State University for four years before returning to ASU. His research has been published in a number of places, including Psychological Review, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, American Psychologist, Handbook of Social Psychology, Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, Psychological Science, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Current Directions in Psychological Science, Perspectives on Psychological Science, and Personality and Social Psychology Review. With John Seamon, he coauthored Psychology (1994). He has taught a graduate course on teaching psychology, and he thoroughly enjoys teaching undergraduate sections of social psychology, for which he has won several teaching awards.

Steven L. Neuberg received his undergraduate degree from Cornell University and his graduate degrees from Carnegie-Mellon University. He spent a postdoctoral year at the University of Waterloo in Canada and has since taught at Arizona State University. Neuberg's research has been published in outlets such as Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Psychological Science, Handbook of Social Psychology, andPerspectives on Psychological Science, and has been supported by the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Science Foundation. He has received a half dozen teaching honors, including his college's Outstanding Teaching Award and the ASU Honors College Outstanding Honors Disciplinary Faculty Award. He has served on federal grant review panels and as associate editor of the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology and teaches a graduate course on teaching social psychology.

Robert B. Cialdini is Regents Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Marketing at Arizona State University. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Wisconsin and his graduate degrees from the University of North Carolina. He is a past president of the Society of Personality and Social Psychology and has received the Society's award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions. His research has appeared in numerous publications, including Handbook of Social Psychology, Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, and Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. His book, Influence: Science and Practice, has sold over 2 million copies and has appeared in 26 languages.

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2. A message from the authors of KNC 5th edition:

My father was a Madison Avenue executive, and I always found his business fascinating. I recently picked up a colorful book on the most successful ads of the 20th century-like the United Colors of Benetton, Apple's Think Different, and Volkswagen's Ugly is Only Skin Deep. It struck me that Madison Avenue has been, at least some of the time, a place where brilliant artistic creativity meets the best principles of scientific social psychology. This stimulated my curiosity about why some work so well, so I ran down the hall to discuss the psychology of advertising with Bob Cialdini (who has been called upon to consult with the Obama campaign, with Al Gore, and with many leading corporations, on just such questions). We thought it would be a kick to make up a few ads that turned the key psychological principles of those 20th century ad campaigns to another purpose: laying out the social psychological principles of the best ad campaigns in a way that connected with the key features or our social psychology text.

Working together with our coauthor Steve Neuberg, and with my son Dave Kenrick (who has a film production degree from NYU, and who has prepared many of the audiovisual supplements for our text), we set up a website with an explanation of the social psychological principles at work in each of those successful ad campaigns. That website also contains links where you can obtain samples of our lecture powerpoints, a sample chapter of the book, and a way to contact your local Pearson sales rep for more information. To check it out, click here: http://www.knc5.com/Ad_Psych

Doug Kenrick

Professor

Arizona State University

Bibliographic information