Lectures on rhetoric and belles lettres (Google eBook)

Front Cover
G. & C. & H. Carvill, 1829 - English language - 557 pages
1 Review
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Lectures on Rhetoric and Belles Lettres (Landmarks in Rhetoric and Public Address)

User Review  - Mary - Goodreads

Brainy fellow that Hugh Blair. Highlights: local, current, national writing; passion and emotion; naive as a good thing; thinking it out first; plenty of admiration of Addison. Read full review

Contents


Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 179 - All the kings of the nations, even all of them, Lie in glory, every one in his own house. But thou art cast out of thy grave like an abominable branch...
Page 459 - Give unto the LORD the glory due unto his name : bring an offering, and come into his courts. O worship the LORD in the beauty of holiness : fear before him, all the earth.
Page 462 - Man knoweth not the price thereof; neither is it found in the land of the living. The depth saith, It is not in me : and the sea saith, It is not with me.
Page 459 - Who shall ascend into the hill of the Lord? and who shall stand in his holy place? He that hath clean hands, and a pure heart; who hath not lifted up his soul unto vanity, nor sworn deceitfully.
Page 221 - A man of a polite imagination is let into a great many pleasures, that the vulgar are not capable of receiving. He can converse with a picture, and find an agreeable companion in a statue. He meets with a secret refreshment in a description,* and often feels a greater satisfaction in the prospect of fields and meadows, than another does in the possession.
Page 459 - O SING unto the LORD a new song: Sing unto the LORD, all the earth.
Page 462 - The God of Israel said, the Rock of Israel spake to me. He that ruleth over men must be just, ruling in the fear of God...
Page 216 - Our sight is the most perfect and most delightful of all our senses. It fills the mind with the largest variety of ideas, converses with its objects at the greatest distance, and continues the longest in action without being tired or satiated with its proper enjoyments. The sense of feeling can indeed give us a notion of extension, shape, and all other ideas that enter at the eye, except colours ; but at the same time it is very much straitened and confined in its operations to the number, bulk,...
Page 40 - Thus saith the Lord, thy redeemer, and he that formed thee from the womb, I am the Lord that maketh all things; that stretcheth forth the heavens alone; that spreadeth abroad the earth by myself...
Page 480 - Thy servants are twelve brethren, the sons of one man, in the land of Canaan ; and behold, the youngest is this day with our father, and one is not.

Bibliographic information