Diaries, 1910-1923 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Jan 21, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 528 pages
4 Reviews

These diaries cover the years 1910 to 1923, the year before Kafka’s death at the age of forty. They provide a penetrating look into life in Prague and into Kafka’s accounts of his dreams, his feelings for the father he worshipped and the woman he could not bring himself to marry, his sense of guilt, and his feelings of being an outcast. They offer an account of a life of almost unbearable intensity.




From the Trade Paperback edition.
  

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Review: Diaries of Franz Kafka

User Review  - Lisa - Goodreads

This took forever to read and it wasn't very interesting. I haven't read Kafka before so I didn't really know what to expect from his memoirs. It was pretty depressing which I don't think is great for me to read. Read full review

Review: Diaries of Franz Kafka

User Review  - Taylor Napolsky - Goodreads

Not as good as his fiction but still fascinating stuff. Worth the read if you really like Kafka. Probably not if you're so-so about him. Read full review

Contents

DIARIES 1910
9
I have now examined my desk more closely
32
My visit to Dr Steiner
48
The Yiddish Theatre Troupe
64
I dreamed today of a donkey
94
Everything theatreadream
111
The education of girls
129
The Literature of Small Peoples
148
make Plans
274
Temptation in the Village
280
The Life ofa Society
289
The Thief
298
DIARIES 1915
324
DIARIES 1916
355
A Singular Judicial Procedure
368
Seeking Advice
377

The Sudden Walk
165
Resolutions
178
He seduced a girl
192
New York Harbour a dream
209
nuumzs 1914
250
Joseph the Coachman
268
mums 1919
390
DIARIES 1923
423
Trip to Friedland and Reichenbcg 1911 42
433
The Triqde and the MM
490
CHRONOLOGY 18831924
504
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Franz Kafka was born in 1883 in Prague, where he lived most of his life. During his lifetime, he published only a few short stories, including “The Metamorphosis,” “The Judgment,” and “The Stoker.” He died in 1924, before completing any of his full-length novels. At the end of his life, Kafka asked his lifelong friend and literary executor Max Brod to burn all his unpublished work. Brod overrode those wishes.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Bibliographic information