From Latin to Spanish: Historical phonology and morphology of the Spanish language (Google eBook)

Front Cover
American Philosophical Society, 1987 - Foreign Language Study - 439 pages
2 Reviews
Paul Lloyd presents an historical grammar of Spanish that includes twentieth-century research on Romance and Spanish languages. He offers a synthesis of the research that has illuminaated much of the phonetic and morphological development of Spanish.
  

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Contents

III
1
IV
6
VI
7
VIII
8
XIII
20
XIV
21
XVI
26
XVII
29
CXX
196
CXXII
197
CXXIII
198
CXXIV
199
CXXVI
200
CXXVII
201
CXXVIII
202
CXXIX
203

XVIII
35
XIX
41
XX
48
XXI
49
XXIII
50
XXIV
51
XXVI
55
XXVII
66
XXVIII
67
XXIX
68
XXX
70
XXXI
71
XXXII
75
XXXIII
76
XXXIV
77
XXXVI
80
XXXVII
82
XXXVIII
84
XXXIX
87
XLI
89
XLII
91
XLIV
92
XLV
93
XLVI
94
XLVIII
95
XLIX
96
L
97
LI
98
LIV
99
LV
102
LVI
103
LX
104
LXIII
105
LXIV
107
LXV
112
LXVI
113
LXVII
114
LXVIII
115
LXIX
116
LXX
117
LXXI
122
LXXII
124
LXXIII
129
LXXIV
131
LXXVI
132
LXXVII
134
LXXVIII
135
LXXIX
137
LXXX
138
LXXXI
139
LXXXIII
140
LXXXV
145
LXXXVI
147
LXXXVII
148
LXXXVIII
150
LXXXIX
154
XC
155
XCI
156
XCII
157
XCIII
158
XCV
159
XCVIII
160
C
161
CI
162
CII
165
CIII
166
CIV
167
CV
169
CVII
170
CVIII
171
CIX
172
CX
180
CXI
181
CXII
184
CXIII
187
CXIV
188
CXV
190
CXVI
191
CXVII
193
CXVIII
194
CXXX
204
CXXXI
205
CXXXII
206
CXXXIII
207
CXXXIV
212
CXXXV
214
CXXXVI
218
CXXXVII
220
CXXXVIII
223
CXL
224
CXLI
225
CXLII
226
CXLIII
228
CXLV
231
CXLVI
232
CXLVII
236
CXLVIII
237
CXLIX
238
CL
241
CLI
242
CLII
244
CLIII
247
CLV
248
CLVII
249
CLVIII
252
CLIX
254
CLXII
258
CLXIII
259
CLXIV
263
CLXV
264
CLXVII
267
CLXVIII
273
CLXIX
275
CLXX
278
CLXXII
279
CLXXIV
281
CLXXV
283
CLXXVI
286
CLXXVII
288
CLXXVIII
289
CLXXIX
291
CLXXX
294
CLXXXI
296
CLXXXII
298
CLXXXIII
300
CLXXXV
303
CLXXXVII
308
CLXXXVIII
309
CLXXXIX
310
CXC
311
CXCI
313
CXCII
315
CXCIV
316
CXCV
320
CXCVII
322
CXCVIII
326
CXCIX
328
CCI
330
CCII
331
CCIV
336
CCV
342
CCVI
344
CCVII
347
CCIX
348
CCX
350
CCXI
351
CCXII
352
CCXIII
353
CCXV
355
CCXVI
358
CCXVII
360
CCXVIII
361
CCXIX
364
CCXXI
365
CCXXII
367
CCXXV
369
CCXXVI
391
CCXXVII
437
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 29 - Cum igitur omnis nostra loquela - preter illam homini primo concreatam a Deo - sit a nostro beneplacito reparata post confusionem illam que nil aliud fuit quam prioris oblivio, et homo sit instabilissimum atque variabilissimum animal, nee durabilis nee continua esse potest, sed sicut alia que nostra sunt, puta mores et habitus, per locorum temporumque distantias 7 variari oportet. Nee dubitandum reor modo in eo quod diximus 'temporum...
Page 334 - El sonido y voz que la f con cédula haze es (como queda dicho) el propio que le da su nombre, que se forma con la estremidad anterior de la lengua casi mordida de los dientes, no apretados, sino de manera que pueda salir algún aliento y espíritu...
Page 22 - ... /oi/ in French to /wa/ or /e/ goes on for centuries, and the same is true for the substitution of /j/ for the palatalized I. Before these changes and after them we observe two different systems, but it would be absurd to say that we have none during the long span of time when these processes go on. At any moment, between the initiation and the conclusion of these changes, we have a state characterized by the presence of more or less free variants, so that the speakers have the choice between...
Page 32 - It seems clear to the present writer that there is no more reason for languages to change than there is for automobiles to add fins one year and remove them the next, for jackets to have three buttons one year and two the next, etc.
Page 18 - First: any group of speakers of language X which regards itself as a close social unit will tend to express its group solidarity by favoring those linguistic innovations which set it apart from other speakers of X who are not part of the group.
Page 16 - Not all variability and heterogeneity in language structure involves change; but all change involves variability and heterogeneity.
Page 16 - Linguistic change is not to be identified with random drift proceeding from inherent variation in speech. Linguistic change begins when the generalization of a particular alternation in a given subgroup of the speech community assumes direction and takes on the character of orderly differentiation.
Page 19 - ... día nacen y se renuevan imperceptiblemente. Cualquier cambio en la actividad colectiva tradicional, lo mismo respecto al lenguaje, que a la canción popular, que a la costumbre jurídica, etc., se funda en el hecho de que muchas generaciones consecutivas participan de una misma idea innovadora y la van realizando persistentemente...
Page 42 - El francés, que antiguamente hablaba el céltico, y el español, que antiguamente hablaba el cántabro o vascongado, actualmente hablan lenguas que son dialectos de la latina; mas quien atentamente las analice y coteje con la céltica y con la cántabra, fácilmente observará que el francés en su dialecto usa no pocos idiotismos célticos, y que del mismo modo el español en su dialecto latino usa muchos idiotismos cántabros: que tanto el francés como el español conservan muchas palabras de...
Page 16 - The association between structure and homogeneity is an illusion. Linguistic structure includes the orderly differentiation of speakers and styles through rules which govern variation in the speech community; native command of the language includes the control of such heterogeneous structures.

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