The Slaves' War: The Civil War in the Words of Former Slaves

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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2008 - History - 386 pages
23 Reviews
The first narrative history of the Civil War told by the very people it freed

Groundbreaking, compelling, and poignant, The Slavesí War delivers an unprecedented vision of the nationís bloodiest conflict. An acclaimed historian of nineteenth-century and African-American history, Andrew Ward gives us the first narrative of the Civil War told from the perspective of those whose destiny it decided. Woven together from hundreds of interviews, diaries, letters, and memoirs, here is the Civil War as seen from not only battlefields, capitals, and camps, but also slave quarters, kitchens, roadsides, farms, towns, and swamps. Speaking in a quintessentially American language of wit, candor, and biblical power, army cooks and launderers, runaways, teamsters, and gravediggers bring the war to vivid life.
From slavesí theories about the causes of the war to their frank assessments of such major figures as Lincoln, Davis, Lee, and Grant; from their searing memories of the carnage of battle to their often startling attitudes toward masters and liberators alike; and from their initial jubilation at the Yankee invasion of the slave South to the crushing disappointment of freedomís promise unfulfilled, The Slavesí War is a transformative and engrossing vision of Americaís Second Revolution.
  

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Review: The Slaves' War: The Civil War in the Words of Former Slaves

User Review  - Robin - Goodreads

Nice well paced read. A fitting book to add to my research of the time. well organized. A well rounded IMO view of those who lived in that time as slaves and how they saw the war. Read full review

Review: The Slaves' War: The Civil War in the Words of Former Slaves

User Review  - Carla Ann - Goodreads

It is a unique and very sobering collection of stories. A must read for anyone truly interested in The Civil War. Read full review

Contents

III
3
IV
6
V
9
VI
23
VII
35
VIII
37
IX
44
X
53
XXVII
173
XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XI
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XII
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVI
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XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XLI
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XLII
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XLIII
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XLIV
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XLV
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XLVI
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XLVII
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XLVIII
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XLIX
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Copyright

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About the author (2008)

ANDREW WARD, a writer for television, an essayist for the Atlantic, National Public Radio's All Things Considered, and the Washington Post, concluded that he would never understand this country until he understood the history and legacy of slavery. Researching his award-winning accounts of the roots of the African-American spiritual in Dark Midnight When I Rise and a Civil War massacre of black troops in River Run Red, Ward kept encountering former slaves' astonishing reminiscences of the war. Amazed that no one had assembled their testimony into a narrative of the conflict that set them free, he has sifted through thousands of eyewitness accounts of every major episode and personage to create a headlong and deeply human chronicle of the bloodiest war in American history.

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