The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (Google eBook)

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Carey, Lea and Blanchard, 1838 - English fiction - 388 pages
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Page 47 - The wall must be crumbled, the stone decayed, To pleasure his dainty whim: And the mouldering dust that years have made Is a merry meal for him. Creeping where no life is seen, A rare old plant is the Ivy green.
Page 235 - ... and at tip-cheese, or odd and even, his hand is out. But Pickwick, gentlemen, Pickwick, the ruthless destroyer of this domestic oasis in the desert of Goswell Street — Pickwick, who has choked up the well, and thrown ashes on the sward — Pickwick, who comes before you today with his heartless...
Page 235 - My client's hopes and prospects are ruined, and it is no figure of speech to say that her occupation is gone indeed. The bill is down - but there is no tenant. Eligible single gentlemen pass and repass - but there is no invitation for them to inquire within or without. All is gloom and silence in the house; even the voice of the child is hushed; his infant sports are disregarded when his mother weeps; his "alley tors" and his "commoneys" are alike neglected; he forgets the long familiar cry of "knuckle...
Page 226 - ... you may have heerd on Mary my dear) altho it does finish a portrait and put the frame and glass on complete with a hook at the end to hang it up by, and all in two minutes and a quarter.
Page 205 - Not an uncommon thing upon ice, sir," replied Mr. Weller. "Hold up, sir!" This last observation of Mr. Weller's bore reference to a demonstration Mr. Winkle made at the instant, of a frantic desire to throw his feet in the air, and dash the back of his head on the ice. "These— these — are very awkward skates; ain't they, Sam?" inquired Mr. Winkle, staggering. "I'm afeerd there's a orkard gen'l'm'n in 'em, sir," replied Sam. "Now, Winkle," cried Mr. Pickwick, quite unconscious that there was anything...
Page 234 - I say systematic villany, gentlemen," said Serjeant Buzfuz, looking through Mr. Pickwick, and talking at him ; " and when I say systematic villany, let me tell the defendant Pickwick, if he be in court, as I am informed he is, that it would have been more decent in him, more becoming, in better judgment, and in better taste, if he had stopped away. Let me tell him...
Page 234 - Before the bill had been in the parlour-window three days - three days, gentlemen — a being, erect upon two legs, and bearing all the outward semblance of a man, and not of a monster, knocked at the door of Mrs Bardell's house. He enquired within; he took the lodgings; and on the very next day he entered into possession of them. This man was Pickwick — Pickwick, the defendant.
Page 234 - Of this man Pickwick I will say little; the subject presents but few attractions; and I, gentlemen, am not the man, nor are you, gentlemen, the men, to delight in the contemplation of revolting heartlessness, and of systematic villany.
Page 226 - No it don't,' replied Sam, reading on very quickly, to avoid contesting the point. '"Except of me Mary my dear as your walentine and think over what I've said. — My dear Mary I will now conclude.
Page 233 - At this pathetic description of the decease of Mr. Bardell, who had been knocked on the head with a quart-pot in a publichouse cellar, the learned...

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