Specimens of English Dramatic Poets: Who Lived about the Time of Shakespeare. With Notes, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Charles Lamb
Edward Moxon, 1844 - English drama
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Page 194 - Of what is't fools make such vain keeping? Sin their conception, their birth weeping, Their life a general mist of error, Their death a hideous storm of terror. Strew your hair with powders sweet, Don clean linen, bathe your feet, And (the foul fiend more to check) A crucifix let bless your neck : 'Tis now full tide 'tween night and day ; End your groan, and come away.
Page 210 - Call for the robin redbreast and the wren, Since o'er shady groves they hover, And with leaves and flowers do cover The friendless bodies of unburied men. Call unto his funeral dole The ant, the field-mouse, and the mole, To rear him hillocks that shall keep him warm, And (when gay tombs are robbed) sustain no harm : But keep the wolf far thence, that's foe to men, For with his nails he'll dig them up again.
Page 25 - I see my tragedy written in thy brows. Yet stay awhile ; forbear thy bloody hand, And let me see the stroke before it comes, That even then when I shall lose my life, My mind may be more steadfast on my God.
Page 28 - Rather had I, a Jew, be hated thus Than pitied in a Christian poverty ; For I can see no fruits in all their faith, But malice, falsehood, and excessive pride, Which, methinks, fits not their profession.
Page 32 - I'll have them read me strange philosophy And tell the secrets of all foreign kings; I'll have them wall all Germany with brass, And make swift Rhine circle fair Wittenberg; I'll have them fill the public schools with silk...
Page 35 - Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of Heaven, That time may cease, and midnight never come; Fair Nature's eye, rise, rise again and make Perpetual day; or let this hour be but A year, a month, a week, a natural day, That Faustus may repent and save his soul! O lente, lente, currite noctis equi!
Page 195 - So I were out of your whispering. Tell my brothers That I perceive death, now I am well awake, Best gift is they can give or I can take. I would fain put off my last woman's fault, I'd not be tedious to you. . . . Pull, and pull strongly, for your able strength Must pull down Heaven upon me: Yet stay; Heaven-gates are not so highly arched As princes' palaces; they that enter there Must go upon their knees.
Page 30 - He surfeits on the cursed necromancy. Nothing so sweet as magic is to him, Which he prefers before his chiefest bliss, And this the man that in his study sits.
Page 26 - O, if thou harbour'st murder in thy heart, Let this gift change thy mind, and save thy soul ! Know that I am a king : O, at that name I feel a hell of grief.
Page 20 - Uncle, his wanton humour grieves not me; But this I scorn, that one so basely born Should by his sovereign's favour grow so pert, And riot it with the treasure of the realm. While soldiers mutiny for want of pay, He wears a lord's revenue on his back, And Midas-like, he jets...

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