Student Perceptions in the Classroom

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Dale H. Schunk, Judith L. Meece
L. Erlbaum, 1992 - Education - 363 pages
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This book's two primary objectives are to present theory and research on the role of learners' achievement-related perceptions in educational contexts and to discuss the implications of this research for educational practices. Although contributors share the view that students' perceptions exert important effects in achievement settings, they differ in diverse ways including their theoretical orientation, their choice of research methodology, the perceptions they believe are of primary importance, and the antecedents and consequences of these perceptions. They discuss the current status of their ideas and provide a forward look at research and practice.

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About the author (1992)

Paul R. Pintrich" is Professor of Education and Psychology and Chair of the Combined Program in Education and Psychology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He also has served as the Associate Dean for Research for the School of Education at Michigan. He has a B.A. in psychology from Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts, and an M.A. in developmental psychology, and a Ph.D. in education and psychology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His research focuses on the development of motivation and self-regulated learning in adolescence and how the classroom context shapes the trajectory of motivation and self-regulation development.

Paul has published over 100 articles and chapters and is co-author or co-editor of eight books, including the "Advances in Motivation and Achievement" series. He also has served as editor of Educational Psychologist, the American Psychological Association journal for Division 15Educational Psychology. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Office of Educational Research and Improvement in the Department of Education, the Spencer Foundation, and the Kellogg Foundation.

Paul has served as President of Division 15-Educational Psychology for the American Psychological Association and is currently President-Elect of Division 5-Educational and Instructional Psychology for the International Association of Applied Psychology. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and has been a National Academy of Education Spencer Fellow. He won the 1999 Best Research Review Article Award from the American Educational Research Association. He also has won the Class of 1923 Award from the College ofLiterature, Science, and Arts and the School of Education at the University of Michigan for excellence in undergraduate teaching.

"Dale H. Schunk" is Dean of the School of Education and Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He holds a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from Stanford University, an M.Ed. from Boston University, and a B.S. from the University of Illinois at Urbana. He has held faculty positions at Purdue University (where he served as Head of the Department of Educational Studies), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (where he also was Chair of the Academic Affairs Institutional Review Board), and the University of Houston.

Dale has edited six books, is author of "Learning Theories: An Educational Perspective" (Prentice Hall, 2000) and over 80 articles and book chapters. He has served as President of Division 15-Educational Psychology for the American Psychological Association and as Secretary of Division iLearning and Instruction for the American Educational Research Association. He is presently a member of the editorial boards of three professional journals.

Dale's teaching and research interests include learning, motivation, and self-regulation. He has received the Early Career Contributions Award in Educational Psychology from the American Psychological Association, the Albert J. Harris Research Award from the International Reading Association, and the Outstanding Service Award from the Purdue University School of Education.

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